Reimagining Obesity

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This article draws on Mills’ sociological imagination (from the 1959 publication The Sociological Imagination) to consider the connections between personal trouble and social issues when it comes to the causes and consequences of obesity. These connections may be important for assuaging the “obesity bias” that pervades our discipline, particularly as it manifests in our undergraduate students and influences the ways they will act as future professionals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)236-255
Number of pages20
JournalQuest
Volume69
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 3 2017

Fingerprint

social issue
cause
trend
student
imagination

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

Schultz, Jaime. / Reimagining Obesity. In: Quest. 2017 ; Vol. 69, No. 2. pp. 236-255.
@article{f5ecc9111f7249d485f9e6385ba4d9a8,
title = "Reimagining Obesity",
abstract = "This article draws on Mills’ sociological imagination (from the 1959 publication The Sociological Imagination) to consider the connections between personal trouble and social issues when it comes to the causes and consequences of obesity. These connections may be important for assuaging the “obesity bias” that pervades our discipline, particularly as it manifests in our undergraduate students and influences the ways they will act as future professionals.",
author = "Jaime Schultz",
year = "2017",
month = "4",
day = "3",
doi = "10.1080/00336297.2016.1218777",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "69",
pages = "236--255",
journal = "Quest",
issn = "0033-6297",
publisher = "Human Kinetics Publishers Inc.",
number = "2",

}

Reimagining Obesity. / Schultz, Jaime.

In: Quest, Vol. 69, No. 2, 03.04.2017, p. 236-255.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Reimagining Obesity

AU - Schultz, Jaime

PY - 2017/4/3

Y1 - 2017/4/3

N2 - This article draws on Mills’ sociological imagination (from the 1959 publication The Sociological Imagination) to consider the connections between personal trouble and social issues when it comes to the causes and consequences of obesity. These connections may be important for assuaging the “obesity bias” that pervades our discipline, particularly as it manifests in our undergraduate students and influences the ways they will act as future professionals.

AB - This article draws on Mills’ sociological imagination (from the 1959 publication The Sociological Imagination) to consider the connections between personal trouble and social issues when it comes to the causes and consequences of obesity. These connections may be important for assuaging the “obesity bias” that pervades our discipline, particularly as it manifests in our undergraduate students and influences the ways they will act as future professionals.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84990240459&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84990240459&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/00336297.2016.1218777

DO - 10.1080/00336297.2016.1218777

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84990240459

VL - 69

SP - 236

EP - 255

JO - Quest

JF - Quest

SN - 0033-6297

IS - 2

ER -