Relational and overt aggression in disruptive adolescents: Prediction from early social representations and links with concurrent problems

Carolyn Zahn-Waxler, Jong Hyo Park, Marilyn Essex, Marcia Slattery, Pamela Marie Cole

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children's representations of conflict and distress situations at 7 years were examined as developmental precursors to relational aggression, overt aggression, and psychiatric symptoms in early adolescence. Children were identified in preschool as normally developing or with behavior problems. Overt, but not relational, aggression, was correlated with concurrent disruptive symptoms in adolescence. Childhood predictors of adolescent aggression were found only for girls: Early hostile themes predicted more relational and overt aggression, while prosocial themes predicted less relational aggression. Also for girls only, early emotions foretold later functioning: Sadness predicted a higher ratio of relational to overt aggression, while inexpressiveness predicted disruptive, anxiety, and depressive symptoms. Relational and overt aggression are discussed with regard to sex differences in symptom changes over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)259-282
Number of pages24
JournalEarly Education and Development
Volume16
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

Fingerprint

Aggression
aggression
adolescent
adolescence
Sex Characteristics
Psychiatry
Emotions
emotion
Anxiety
childhood
Depression
anxiety

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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Relational and overt aggression in disruptive adolescents : Prediction from early social representations and links with concurrent problems. / Zahn-Waxler, Carolyn; Park, Jong Hyo; Essex, Marilyn; Slattery, Marcia; Cole, Pamela Marie.

In: Early Education and Development, Vol. 16, No. 2, 01.01.2005, p. 259-282.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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