Relational Autonomy and the Social Dynamics of Paternalism

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this paper I look at various ways that interpersonal and social relations can be seen as required for autonomy. I then consider cases where those dynamics might play out or not in potentially paternalistic situations. In particular, I consider cases of especially vulnerable persons who are attempting to reconstruct a sense of practical identity required for their autonomy and need the potential paternalist's aid in doing so. I then draw out the implications for standard liberal principles of (anti-) paternalism, specifically in clinical or therapeutic situations. The picture of potential paternalism that emerges here is much more of a dynamic, interpersonal scenario rather than a case of two separate individuals making decisions independent of each other.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)369-382
Number of pages14
JournalEthical Theory and Moral Practice
Volume17
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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paternalism
autonomy
interpersonal relation
Social Relations
scenario
decision making
human being
Autonomy
Paternalism
Scenarios
Person
Interpersonal Relations
Therapeutics
Decision Making

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Philosophy
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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Relational Autonomy and the Social Dynamics of Paternalism. / Christman, John Philip.

In: Ethical Theory and Moral Practice, Vol. 17, No. 3, 01.01.2014, p. 369-382.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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