Relational Framing Theory: Utterance Form and Relational Context as Antecedents of Frame Salience

Rachel M. McLaren, James Dillard, Kyle James Tusing, Denise Haunani Solomon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using relational framing theory, this article examines the influence of utterance type and relational context on the salience of relational frames. The authors report the results of two studies that used scenarios to manipulate utterance form and information about the relationship between interactants. Participants rated the relevance of dominance-submissiveness and affiliation-disaffiliation frames to interpreting the hypothetical interactions. Results showed that judgments of dominance-submissiveness frame salience were sensitive to variations in utterance type and relational context, but the results were mixed for the affiliation-disaffiliation frame. The authors discuss the implications for relational framing theory and the possibility of an affiliation bias.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)518-535
Number of pages18
JournalCommunication Quarterly
Volume62
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 20 2014

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Communication

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Relational Framing Theory : Utterance Form and Relational Context as Antecedents of Frame Salience. / McLaren, Rachel M.; Dillard, James; Tusing, Kyle James; Solomon, Denise Haunani.

In: Communication Quarterly, Vol. 62, No. 5, 20.10.2014, p. 518-535.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T2 - Utterance Form and Relational Context as Antecedents of Frame Salience

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AU - Tusing, Kyle James

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