Relationship and partner moderator variables increase self-efficacy of performing skin self-examination

June K. Robinson, Jerod Stapleton, Robert J. Turrisi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: We sought to identify relationship and partner-related moderating variables that influence the effectiveness of both a couples and a solo learning intervention designed to increase skin self-examination behavior in a sample of patients at risk for developing melanoma. Methods: Patients received a brief intervention designed to teach skin self-examination skills and were randomly assigned into either a solo learning condition where the intervention was administered to the patient alone (n = 65) or a couple learning condition where the intervention was administered to the patient and patient's spouse or cohabiting partner (n = 65). The main outcome measure was skin self-examination self-efficacy, which is the strongest mediator of skin self-examination. The relationship moderator variables measured were quality of relationship, partner motivation, and ability to assist in implementation of the intervention. Results: When quality of the marital/partner relationship was high, the beneficial effects provided by the partner being included in the skin self-examination skills training were the highest and patients exhibited higher self-efficacy. Similar effects were observed for those with partners who were motivated to implement the intervention, and for those with partners high in ability to provide support. Limitations: Study limitations include the need to evaluate whether the effects can be sustained long term and the exclusion of patients with melanoma without partners. Conclusions: The amount of beneficial effects gained by the patient from the skin self-examination intervention was influenced by marital/partner relationships. Clinicians may need to consider these relationship and partner characteristics when communicating to patients about skin cancer screening.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)755-762
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Dermatology
Volume58
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2008

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Epidemiologic Effect Modifiers
Self-Examination
Self Efficacy
Skin
Aptitude
Learning
Marriage
Melanoma
Skin Neoplasms
Spouses
Early Detection of Cancer
Motivation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Dermatology

Cite this

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abstract = "Objective: We sought to identify relationship and partner-related moderating variables that influence the effectiveness of both a couples and a solo learning intervention designed to increase skin self-examination behavior in a sample of patients at risk for developing melanoma. Methods: Patients received a brief intervention designed to teach skin self-examination skills and were randomly assigned into either a solo learning condition where the intervention was administered to the patient alone (n = 65) or a couple learning condition where the intervention was administered to the patient and patient's spouse or cohabiting partner (n = 65). The main outcome measure was skin self-examination self-efficacy, which is the strongest mediator of skin self-examination. The relationship moderator variables measured were quality of relationship, partner motivation, and ability to assist in implementation of the intervention. Results: When quality of the marital/partner relationship was high, the beneficial effects provided by the partner being included in the skin self-examination skills training were the highest and patients exhibited higher self-efficacy. Similar effects were observed for those with partners who were motivated to implement the intervention, and for those with partners high in ability to provide support. Limitations: Study limitations include the need to evaluate whether the effects can be sustained long term and the exclusion of patients with melanoma without partners. Conclusions: The amount of beneficial effects gained by the patient from the skin self-examination intervention was influenced by marital/partner relationships. Clinicians may need to consider these relationship and partner characteristics when communicating to patients about skin cancer screening.",
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Relationship and partner moderator variables increase self-efficacy of performing skin self-examination. / Robinson, June K.; Stapleton, Jerod; Turrisi, Robert J.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, Vol. 58, No. 5, 01.05.2008, p. 755-762.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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