Relationship between hyperlipidemia, lipid mediators, and progressive glomerulosclerosis in the nephrotic syndrome

Deborah Kees-Folts, Jonathan R. Diamond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

34 Scopus citations

Abstract

Nephrotic syndrome is defined by proteinuria, hypoalbuminemia, edema and hypercholesterolemia. Evidence from both the experimental and clinical literature suggests that high lipid levels are not only a marker of disease, but also contribute to the process of glomerulosclerosis. Lipid mediators, including eicosanoids, platelet-activating factor, and chemotactic factors, can contribute by effecting leukocyte infiltration, mesangial proliferation, extracellular matrix protein production, vasoreactivity, and coagulation. Infiltrating macrophages may play a central role in these processes. Therapeutic maneuvers aimed at the correction of lipid abnormalities may halt or slow the progression of nephrotic syndrome to end-stage renal disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)365-375
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Nephrology
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nephrology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Relationship between hyperlipidemia, lipid mediators, and progressive glomerulosclerosis in the nephrotic syndrome'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this