Relationship between motor symptoms, cognition, and demographic characteristics in treated mild/moderate Parkinson's disease

Jay S. Schneider, Stephanie Sendek, Chengwu Yang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Although Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized primarily by motor symptoms, PD patients, at all stages of the disease, can experience cognitive dysfunction. However, the relationships between cognitive and motor symptoms and specific demographic characteristics are not well defined, particularly for patients who have progressed to requiring dopaminergic medication. Objective: To examine relationships between motor and cognitive symptoms and various demographic factors in mild to moderate, PD patients requiring anti-PD medication. Methods: Cognitive function was assessed in 94 subjects with a variety of neuropsychological tests during baseline evaluations as part of an experimental treatment study. Data were analyzed in relation to Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor scores and demographic variables. Results: Of the UPDRS subscores analyzed, posture/balance/gait was associated with the highest number of adverse cognitive outcomes followed by speech/facial expression, bradykinesia, and rigidity. No associations were detected between any of the cognitive performance measures and tremor. Motor functioning assessed in the "off" condition correlated primarily with disease duration; neuropsychological performance in general was primarily related to age. Conclusion: In PD patients who have advanced to requiring anti-PD therapies, there are salient associations between axial signs and cognitive performance and in particular, with different aspects of visuospatial function suggesting involvement of similar circuits in these functions. Associations between executive functions and bradykinesia also suggest involvement similar circuits in these functions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0123231
JournalPloS one
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 23 2015

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sociodemographic characteristics
Parkinson disease
cognition
Cognition
signs and symptoms (animals and humans)
Parkinson Disease
Demography
Hypokinesia
Neurobehavioral Manifestations
drug therapy
demographic statistics
rating scales
Facial Expression
Neuropsychological Tests
Executive Function
neurodegenerative diseases
Tremor
gait
posture
Posture

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

Cite this

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Relationship between motor symptoms, cognition, and demographic characteristics in treated mild/moderate Parkinson's disease. / Schneider, Jay S.; Sendek, Stephanie; Yang, Chengwu.

In: PloS one, Vol. 10, No. 4, e0123231, 23.04.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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