Relationship between off-ice testing variables and on-ice speed in women's collegiate synchronized figure skaters: Implications for training

Michelle E. Bower, William J. Kraemer, Jeffrey A. Potteiger, Jeff S. Volek, Disa A. Hatfield, Jakob L. Vingren, Barry A. Spiering, Maren S. Fragala, Jen Yu Ho, Gwendolyn Thomas, Jacob E. Earp, Keijo Häkkinen, Carl M. Maresh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of the current investigation was to identify any existing relationships between off-ice performance measures and on-ice performance quantified by speed and acceleration. Twenty-seven women (age 1961 year; body mass (59.5±6.8 kg; height 164.6±6.35 cm; body fat 23.2 ± 3.9%) who were collegiate synchronized figure skaters volunteered for the investigation. To examine the relationship between off-ice performance and on-ice speed and acceleration, collegiate synchronized skaters were evaluated on various performance tests over a 1-week period. Off-ice tests completed were peak torque for hip abduction and adduction, 40-yard sprint, vertical jump height, 30-second slide board stride count, and a 1-RM (repetition maximum) squat. Onice tests included a timed single lap sprint, 4.5-minute (duration of long program) lap count, and an approximately 16.5-m (18- yard blue line to blue line) timed acceleration. Significance was set at P ≤ 0.05. This study showed 3 primary findings: (a) slide board stride count was the single best predictor for both single lap on-ice speed and acceleration accounting for 53.5% (adjusted R2 value) of the variance in the single lap test and 42.5% (adjusted R2 value) of the variance in acceleration times; (b) vertical jump height test was the second best predictor for both the single lap test and on-ice acceleration accounting for 36.6% and 39.9% (adjusted R 2 values) of the variance in times recorded, respectively; and (c) the best combined predictors for the single lap speed test were slide board stride count and 40-yard dash (R2 = 0.675), whereas the best combined predictors for on-ice acceleration were slide board stride count and vertical jump height test (R2 = 0.571). Conditioning for synchronized skaters to enhance performance of on-the-ice speed and acceleration should include slide board training implementation of plyometric and linear speed training while developing and maintaining 1-RM strength to support power capabilities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)831-839
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of strength and conditioning research
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Bower, M. E., Kraemer, W. J., Potteiger, J. A., Volek, J. S., Hatfield, D. A., Vingren, J. L., Spiering, B. A., Fragala, M. S., Ho, J. Y., Thomas, G., Earp, J. E., Häkkinen, K., & Maresh, C. M. (2010). Relationship between off-ice testing variables and on-ice speed in women's collegiate synchronized figure skaters: Implications for training. Journal of strength and conditioning research, 24(3), 831-839. https://doi.org/10.1519/JSC.0b013e3181a59a5c