Relationships among psychosocial factors, biomarkers, preeclampsia, and preterm birth in African American women: A pilot

Carmen Giurgescu, Natthananporn Sanguanklin, Christopher G. Engeland, Rosemary C. White-Traut, Chang Park, Herbert L. Mathews, Linda Witek Janusek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aim: To explore the relationships among psychosocial factors (optimism, uncertainty, social support, coping, psychological distress), biomarkers (cortisol, cytokines), preeclampsia, and preterm birth in African American women. Methods: Forty-nine pregnant African American women completed psychosocial questionnaires and had blood collected for biomarkers between 26 and 36 weeks of gestation. Birth outcomes were obtained from birth records. Results: Women reporting higher levels of social support had lower levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-2, IL-5, and IL-6). Surprisingly, compared with low-risk pregnant women, women diagnosed with preeclampsia reported more optimism and less avoidance, and had lower levels of cortisol and IFN-γ. Similarly, compared to women with full-term birth, women with preterm birth reported higher levels of optimism and lower levels of avoidance, and had lower levels of IL-10. Conclusion: Psychosocial factors influence inflammation and pregnancy outcomes. Close assessment and monitoring of psychosocial factors may contribute to improved pregnancy outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e1-e6
JournalApplied Nursing Research
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2015

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Premature Birth
Pre-Eclampsia
African Americans
Biomarkers
Psychology
Pregnancy Outcome
Social Support
Hydrocortisone
Term Birth
Cytokines
Birth Certificates
Interleukin-5
Interleukin-10
Uncertainty
Interleukin-2
Pregnant Women
Interleukin-6
Parturition
Inflammation
Pregnancy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Giurgescu, Carmen ; Sanguanklin, Natthananporn ; Engeland, Christopher G. ; White-Traut, Rosemary C. ; Park, Chang ; Mathews, Herbert L. ; Janusek, Linda Witek. / Relationships among psychosocial factors, biomarkers, preeclampsia, and preterm birth in African American women : A pilot. In: Applied Nursing Research. 2015 ; Vol. 28, No. 1. pp. e1-e6.
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Relationships among psychosocial factors, biomarkers, preeclampsia, and preterm birth in African American women : A pilot. / Giurgescu, Carmen; Sanguanklin, Natthananporn; Engeland, Christopher G.; White-Traut, Rosemary C.; Park, Chang; Mathews, Herbert L.; Janusek, Linda Witek.

In: Applied Nursing Research, Vol. 28, No. 1, 01.02.2015, p. e1-e6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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