Relative or absolute standards for child poverty: A state-level analysis of infant and child mortality

Marianne Messersmith Hillemeier, John Lynch, Sam Harper, Trivellore Raghunathan, George A. Kaplan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. The purpose of the present study was to compare the associations of state-referenced and federal poverty measures with states' infant and child mortality rates. Methods. Compressed mortality and Current Population Survey data were used to examine relationships between mortality and (1) state-referenced poverty (percentage of children below half the state median income) and (2) percentage of children below the federal poverty line. Results. State-referenced poverty was not associated with mortality among infants or children, whereas poverty as defined by national standards was strongly related to mortality. Conclusions. Infant and child mortality is more closely tied to families' capacity for meeting basic needs than to relative position within a state's economic hierarchy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)652-657
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of public health
Volume93
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2003

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Child Mortality
Infant Mortality
Poverty
Mortality
Economics
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Hillemeier, Marianne Messersmith ; Lynch, John ; Harper, Sam ; Raghunathan, Trivellore ; Kaplan, George A. / Relative or absolute standards for child poverty : A state-level analysis of infant and child mortality. In: American journal of public health. 2003 ; Vol. 93, No. 4. pp. 652-657.
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Relative or absolute standards for child poverty : A state-level analysis of infant and child mortality. / Hillemeier, Marianne Messersmith; Lynch, John; Harper, Sam; Raghunathan, Trivellore; Kaplan, George A.

In: American journal of public health, Vol. 93, No. 4, 01.04.2003, p. 652-657.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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