Relative validation of fruit and vegetable intake and fat intake among overweight and obese African-American women

Iris Alcantara, Regine Haardörfer, Julie A. Gazmararian, Terryl Johnson Hartman, Brenda Greene, Michelle C. Kegler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To compare commonly used dietary screeners for fat intake and fruit and vegetable intake with 24 h dietary recalls among low-income, overweight and obese African-American women. Design: Three telephone interviews were completed; measures included two 24 h dietary recalls (a weekday and weekend day) using the Nutrition Data System for Research software, the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System's (BRFSS) Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Module and the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Percentage Energy from Fat Screener. Setting: Participants were recruited from three federally qualified health centres in south-west Georgia, USA. Subjects: Participants (n 260) were African-American women ranging in age from 35 to 65 years. About half were unemployed (49·6%) and 58·7% had a high-school education or less. Most were obese (88·5%), with 39·6% reporting a BMI≥40·0 kg/m2. Results: Mean fruit and vegetable intake reported from the 24 h dietary recall was 2·66 servings/d compared with 2·79 servings/d with the BRFSS measure. The deattenuated Pearson correlation was 0·22, with notable variation by weight status, education level and age. Mean percentage of energy from fat was 35·5% as reported from the 24 h dietary recall, compared with 33·0% as measured by the NCI fat screener. The deattenuated Pearson correlation was 0·38, also with notable variation by weight status, education level and age. Conclusions: Validity of brief dietary intake measures may vary by demographic characteristics of the sample. Additional measurement work may be needed to accurately measure dietary intake in obese African-American women.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1932-1940
Number of pages9
JournalPublic Health Nutrition
Volume18
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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African Americans
Vegetables
Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System
Fruit
National Cancer Institute (U.S.)
Fats
Education
Weights and Measures
Dietary Fats
Information Systems
Software
Demography
Interviews
Health
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Alcantara, I., Haardörfer, R., Gazmararian, J. A., Hartman, T. J., Greene, B., & Kegler, M. C. (2015). Relative validation of fruit and vegetable intake and fat intake among overweight and obese African-American women. Public Health Nutrition, 18(11), 1932-1940. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980014002547
Alcantara, Iris ; Haardörfer, Regine ; Gazmararian, Julie A. ; Hartman, Terryl Johnson ; Greene, Brenda ; Kegler, Michelle C. / Relative validation of fruit and vegetable intake and fat intake among overweight and obese African-American women. In: Public Health Nutrition. 2015 ; Vol. 18, No. 11. pp. 1932-1940.
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Alcantara, I, Haardörfer, R, Gazmararian, JA, Hartman, TJ, Greene, B & Kegler, MC 2015, 'Relative validation of fruit and vegetable intake and fat intake among overweight and obese African-American women', Public Health Nutrition, vol. 18, no. 11, pp. 1932-1940. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1368980014002547

Relative validation of fruit and vegetable intake and fat intake among overweight and obese African-American women. / Alcantara, Iris; Haardörfer, Regine; Gazmararian, Julie A.; Hartman, Terryl Johnson; Greene, Brenda; Kegler, Michelle C.

In: Public Health Nutrition, Vol. 18, No. 11, 01.01.2015, p. 1932-1940.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Haardörfer, Regine

AU - Gazmararian, Julie A.

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N2 - Objective: To compare commonly used dietary screeners for fat intake and fruit and vegetable intake with 24 h dietary recalls among low-income, overweight and obese African-American women. Design: Three telephone interviews were completed; measures included two 24 h dietary recalls (a weekday and weekend day) using the Nutrition Data System for Research software, the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System's (BRFSS) Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Module and the National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Percentage Energy from Fat Screener. Setting: Participants were recruited from three federally qualified health centres in south-west Georgia, USA. Subjects: Participants (n 260) were African-American women ranging in age from 35 to 65 years. About half were unemployed (49·6%) and 58·7% had a high-school education or less. Most were obese (88·5%), with 39·6% reporting a BMI≥40·0 kg/m2. Results: Mean fruit and vegetable intake reported from the 24 h dietary recall was 2·66 servings/d compared with 2·79 servings/d with the BRFSS measure. The deattenuated Pearson correlation was 0·22, with notable variation by weight status, education level and age. Mean percentage of energy from fat was 35·5% as reported from the 24 h dietary recall, compared with 33·0% as measured by the NCI fat screener. The deattenuated Pearson correlation was 0·38, also with notable variation by weight status, education level and age. Conclusions: Validity of brief dietary intake measures may vary by demographic characteristics of the sample. Additional measurement work may be needed to accurately measure dietary intake in obese African-American women.

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