Reliability of HemoCue in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding

Andry Van De Louw, Nadine Lasserre, François Drouhin, Stéphane Thierry, Lucien Lecuyer, Daniel Caen, Alain Tenaillon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: HemoCue is routinely used to manage bleeding patients, but few studies have evaluated its accuracy in this population. We compared HemoCue with laboratory determination of blood hemoglobin in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Design and setting: A prospective observational study in a 14-bed medicosurgical ICU and an emergency department in an urban general hospital. Patients: 94 patients admitted to the emergency department or to the ICU for gastrointestinal bleeding. Interventions: Blood was drawn at admission to measure laboratory hemoglobin and capillary hemoglobin was measured simultaneously by HemoCue. The unit of hospitalization and the presence or absence of impaired vital signs (tachycardia and/or hypotension and/or shock) were recorded. Measurements and results: The mean difference between HemoCue and hemoglobin (bias) was -0.06 g/dl and standard deviation (precision) 0.87 g/dl. (95% CI -1.8 to 1.68). Discrepancies between HemoCue and hemoglobin were greater than 1 g/dl in 21% of cases. Bias was comparable between patients admitted to the ICU and those in the emergency department. The accuracy of HemoCue was not affected by the presence of impaired vital signs or by a hemoglobin level below 9 g/dl or 7 g/dl. Conclusions: Although we demonstrated a low bias between HemoCue and blood hemoglobin determination, large HemoCue vs. hemoglobin differences may still occur, and therefore therapeutic decisions based upon capillary HemoCue alone should be very cautious.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)355-358
Number of pages4
JournalIntensive Care Medicine
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2007

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Hemoglobins
Hemorrhage
Hospital Emergency Service
Vital Signs
Urban Hospitals
Tachycardia
General Hospitals
Hypotension
Observational Studies
Shock
Hospitalization
Prospective Studies
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Van De Louw, A., Lasserre, N., Drouhin, F., Thierry, S., Lecuyer, L., Caen, D., & Tenaillon, A. (2007). Reliability of HemoCue in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Intensive Care Medicine, 33(2), 355-358. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00134-006-0461-6
Van De Louw, Andry ; Lasserre, Nadine ; Drouhin, François ; Thierry, Stéphane ; Lecuyer, Lucien ; Caen, Daniel ; Tenaillon, Alain. / Reliability of HemoCue in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. In: Intensive Care Medicine. 2007 ; Vol. 33, No. 2. pp. 355-358.
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Van De Louw, A, Lasserre, N, Drouhin, F, Thierry, S, Lecuyer, L, Caen, D & Tenaillon, A 2007, 'Reliability of HemoCue in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding', Intensive Care Medicine, vol. 33, no. 2, pp. 355-358. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00134-006-0461-6

Reliability of HemoCue in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. / Van De Louw, Andry; Lasserre, Nadine; Drouhin, François; Thierry, Stéphane; Lecuyer, Lucien; Caen, Daniel; Tenaillon, Alain.

In: Intensive Care Medicine, Vol. 33, No. 2, 01.02.2007, p. 355-358.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Reliability of HemoCue in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding

AU - Van De Louw, Andry

AU - Lasserre, Nadine

AU - Drouhin, François

AU - Thierry, Stéphane

AU - Lecuyer, Lucien

AU - Caen, Daniel

AU - Tenaillon, Alain

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Y1 - 2007/2/1

N2 - Objective: HemoCue is routinely used to manage bleeding patients, but few studies have evaluated its accuracy in this population. We compared HemoCue with laboratory determination of blood hemoglobin in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Design and setting: A prospective observational study in a 14-bed medicosurgical ICU and an emergency department in an urban general hospital. Patients: 94 patients admitted to the emergency department or to the ICU for gastrointestinal bleeding. Interventions: Blood was drawn at admission to measure laboratory hemoglobin and capillary hemoglobin was measured simultaneously by HemoCue. The unit of hospitalization and the presence or absence of impaired vital signs (tachycardia and/or hypotension and/or shock) were recorded. Measurements and results: The mean difference between HemoCue and hemoglobin (bias) was -0.06 g/dl and standard deviation (precision) 0.87 g/dl. (95% CI -1.8 to 1.68). Discrepancies between HemoCue and hemoglobin were greater than 1 g/dl in 21% of cases. Bias was comparable between patients admitted to the ICU and those in the emergency department. The accuracy of HemoCue was not affected by the presence of impaired vital signs or by a hemoglobin level below 9 g/dl or 7 g/dl. Conclusions: Although we demonstrated a low bias between HemoCue and blood hemoglobin determination, large HemoCue vs. hemoglobin differences may still occur, and therefore therapeutic decisions based upon capillary HemoCue alone should be very cautious.

AB - Objective: HemoCue is routinely used to manage bleeding patients, but few studies have evaluated its accuracy in this population. We compared HemoCue with laboratory determination of blood hemoglobin in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding. Design and setting: A prospective observational study in a 14-bed medicosurgical ICU and an emergency department in an urban general hospital. Patients: 94 patients admitted to the emergency department or to the ICU for gastrointestinal bleeding. Interventions: Blood was drawn at admission to measure laboratory hemoglobin and capillary hemoglobin was measured simultaneously by HemoCue. The unit of hospitalization and the presence or absence of impaired vital signs (tachycardia and/or hypotension and/or shock) were recorded. Measurements and results: The mean difference between HemoCue and hemoglobin (bias) was -0.06 g/dl and standard deviation (precision) 0.87 g/dl. (95% CI -1.8 to 1.68). Discrepancies between HemoCue and hemoglobin were greater than 1 g/dl in 21% of cases. Bias was comparable between patients admitted to the ICU and those in the emergency department. The accuracy of HemoCue was not affected by the presence of impaired vital signs or by a hemoglobin level below 9 g/dl or 7 g/dl. Conclusions: Although we demonstrated a low bias between HemoCue and blood hemoglobin determination, large HemoCue vs. hemoglobin differences may still occur, and therefore therapeutic decisions based upon capillary HemoCue alone should be very cautious.

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