Religion and child rearing

Duane Francis Alwin, Jacob L. Felson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Parenthood is both a biological and social status. Viewed within a biological life cycle framework, parenthood can be seen as a natural outcome of reproduction and regeneration. Viewed from a social and cultural perspective, the situation of parenthood conveys certain rights, responsibilities, obligations, and associated expectations regarding the care and nurture of children. While the biological role of parenthood has important consequences for children-particularly in the transmission of genetic information and predispositions that may have developmental consequences-our focus here is on parenthood as a social and cultural phenomenon. The objective of this review is to consider how variations in religion-religious identities, beliefs, and behavior-shape how the parental role is enacted and the possible consequences for child development.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationReligion, Families, and Health
Subtitle of host publicationPopulation-Based Research in the United States
PublisherRutgers University Press
Pages40-60
Number of pages21
ISBN (Print)9780813547183
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010

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parenthood
Religion
life cycle
social status
obligation
responsibility

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Alwin, D. F., & Felson, J. L. (2010). Religion and child rearing. In Religion, Families, and Health: Population-Based Research in the United States (pp. 40-60). Rutgers University Press.
Alwin, Duane Francis ; Felson, Jacob L. / Religion and child rearing. Religion, Families, and Health: Population-Based Research in the United States. Rutgers University Press, 2010. pp. 40-60
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Alwin, DF & Felson, JL 2010, Religion and child rearing. in Religion, Families, and Health: Population-Based Research in the United States. Rutgers University Press, pp. 40-60.

Religion and child rearing. / Alwin, Duane Francis; Felson, Jacob L.

Religion, Families, and Health: Population-Based Research in the United States. Rutgers University Press, 2010. p. 40-60.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Alwin DF, Felson JL. Religion and child rearing. In Religion, Families, and Health: Population-Based Research in the United States. Rutgers University Press. 2010. p. 40-60