Remaking transportation organizations for the 21st century

Consortia and the value of organizational learning

Jonathan L. Gifford, Odd Jonas Stalebrink

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The US faces a number of important issues in the way it organizes and manages transportation facilities and services. A key issue is how to create organizations that pay attention to customers and focus on results and performance. However, these two organizational characteristics are often difficult to achieve in formal organizations like governments, which are bound by requirements for procedural integrity. This paper examines a way out of this dilemma: transportation organizations can participate in voluntary consortia, which may offer more flexibility and adaptability and facilitate organizational learning. To gain new insights into the potential benefits of voluntary consortia this paper examines two case studies of transportation-related voluntary consortia, taking an organizational learning perspective. It concludes that although further research is needed, consortia may offer many benefits, including their ability to provide a quick, low-threat response to changing conditions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)645-657
Number of pages13
JournalTransportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice
Volume36
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2002

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learning organization
Values
integrity
flexibility
customer
threat
ability
performance
Consortium
Organizational learning

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Transportation
  • Management Science and Operations Research

Cite this

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