Remote high temperature thermometry using ultrasonic guided waves in thin wires

Matthew Kropf, Mike Pedrick, Bernhard Tittmann

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

An ultrasonic technique to accurately and remotely measure high temperatures has been developed. Using long, thin (∼2 mm) refractory metal wires as ultrasonic wave guides, changes in time-of-flight between fixed reflectors are monitored while the temperature of the wire changes. Several physical phenomena contribute to the change in the time of flight as the temperature of the wire increases. The wire thermally expands causing both the physical distance between reflected signals to increase and the density of the wire to decrease. The velocity of sound decreases due to changes in Young's Modulus and density. By relating these effects in terms of guided wave propagation to the precise time-of-flight measurement, temperature can be accurately measured from 20 to over 1000 degrees Celsius. Measurements have been made on wire waveguides of lengths greater than 20 meters. By using digitally automated signal processing to monitor the changes in time-of-flight, temperature measurements can be made continuously. This method of ultrasonic in-situ thermometry has proven viable in accurately and remotely monitoring high temperatures in harsh environments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationReview of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation: Volume 25B
Pages1570-1576
Number of pages7
Volume820 II
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 6 2006
EventReview of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive - Brunswick, ME, United States
Duration: Jul 31 2005Aug 5 2005

Other

OtherReview of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive
CountryUnited States
CityBrunswick, ME
Period7/31/058/5/05

    Fingerprint

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Kropf, M., Pedrick, M., & Tittmann, B. (2006). Remote high temperature thermometry using ultrasonic guided waves in thin wires. In Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation: Volume 25B (Vol. 820 II, pp. 1570-1576) https://doi.org/10.1063/1.2184709