Replacement planning

A starting point for succession planning and talent management

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Replacement planning is a process of identifying short-term or long-term backups so that organizations have people who can assume responsibility for critical positions during emergencies. Individuals identified as 'replacements' are not promised promotions; rather, they are prepared to the point where they can assume a critical position long enough for the organization's leaders to do a proper internal and external search for a permanent replacement. It should not be confused with succession planning, which focuses on developing a pool of people to consider for promotion, or talent management, which focuses on attracting, developing, deploying and retaining the best people. Using a case study approach, this article describes how one organization used replacement planning as a means to raise and consider important issues as a starting point for the eventual implementation of succession planning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)87-99
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Training and Development
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2011

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planning
management
promotion
leader
organization
responsibility
Succession planning
Talent management
Replacement
Planning
Emergency
Responsibility

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

Cite this

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