Reply to Brunet and Doolittle: Both selected effect and causal role elements can influence human biology and disease

Manolis Kellis, Barbara Wold, Michael P. Snyder, Bradley E. Bernstein, Anshul Kundaje, Georgi K. Marinov, Lucas D. Ward, Ewan Birney, Gregory E. Crawford, Job Dekker, Ian Dunham, Laura L. Elnitski, Peggy J. Farnham, Elise A. Feingold, Mark Gerstein, Morgan C. Giddings, David M. Gilbert, Thomas R. Gingeras, Eric D. Green, Roderic GuigoTim Hubbard, Jim Kent, Jason D. Lieb, Richard M. Myers, Michael J. Pazin, Bing Ren, John Stamatoyannopoulos, Zhiping Weng, Kevin P. White, Ross C. Hardison

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

5 Scopus citations
Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E3366
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume111
Issue number33
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 19 2014

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • General

Cite this

Kellis, M., Wold, B., Snyder, M. P., Bernstein, B. E., Kundaje, A., Marinov, G. K., Ward, L. D., Birney, E., Crawford, G. E., Dekker, J., Dunham, I., Elnitski, L. L., Farnham, P. J., Feingold, E. A., Gerstein, M., Giddings, M. C., Gilbert, D. M., Gingeras, T. R., Green, E. D., ... Hardison, R. C. (2014). Reply to Brunet and Doolittle: Both selected effect and causal role elements can influence human biology and disease. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 111(33), E3366. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1410434111