Reply to comment by Añel on “Most computational hydrology is not reproducible, so is it really science?”

Christopher Hutton, Thorsten Wagener, Jim Freer, Dawei Han, Christopher J. Duffy, Berit Arheimer

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

In this article, we reply to a comment made on our previous commentary regarding reproducibility in computational hydrology. Software licensing and version control of code are important technical aspects of making code and workflows of scientific experiments open and reproducible. However, in our view, it is the cultural change that is the greatest challenge to overcome to achieve reproducible scientific research in computational hydrology. We believe that from changing the culture and attitude among hydrological scientists, details will evolve to cover more (technical) aspects over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2575-2576
Number of pages2
JournalWater Resources Research
Volume53
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

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hydrology
cultural change
software
experiment
code
science
licencing
scientific research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Water Science and Technology

Cite this

Hutton, Christopher ; Wagener, Thorsten ; Freer, Jim ; Han, Dawei ; Duffy, Christopher J. ; Arheimer, Berit. / Reply to comment by Añel on “Most computational hydrology is not reproducible, so is it really science?”. In: Water Resources Research. 2017 ; Vol. 53, No. 3. pp. 2575-2576.
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Reply to comment by Añel on “Most computational hydrology is not reproducible, so is it really science?”. / Hutton, Christopher; Wagener, Thorsten; Freer, Jim; Han, Dawei; Duffy, Christopher J.; Arheimer, Berit.

In: Water Resources Research, Vol. 53, No. 3, 01.03.2017, p. 2575-2576.

Research output: Contribution to journalLetter

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AU - Arheimer, Berit

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