Research note: Identifying the invisible colleges of the British journal of industrial relations: A bibliometric and social network approach

Gregory McMillan, Debra L. Casey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The academic field of industrial relations has gone through much change in the last 20 years. On account of the rapid decline in union membership in the USA and the UK, industrial relations, which historically has focused on the employment relationship, has been searching for a new intellectual base. By conducting a bibliometric analysis of the journal British Journal of Industrial Relations (BJIR), we uncover the intellectual bases for that publication outlet for two time periods, 1986-1995 and 1996-2005. From the late 1980s to the mid-1990s, BJIR's articles relied on the economics literature, while in the later period, it moved to the human resource and management journals, authors and articles. The possible explanations and implications of these findings are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)815-828
Number of pages14
JournalBritish Journal of Industrial Relations
Volume45
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007

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Industrial relations
Personnel
Economics
Social networks
Bibliometrics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Business, Management and Accounting(all)
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Cite this

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