Resident Handover: Need for Structured Curriculum and Quality Outcome Studies

Justen M. Aprile, Ben D. Reed, Shankar Baskar, Bettina M. Aprile, Sangeeta Krishna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a structured handoff curriculum to increase competency and efficiency at handoff, improve resident perception of handoff, and impact patient outcomes. Methods: Trained faculty assessed residents (n = 15) at a single center using a validated evaluation tool measuring the following: organization/efficiency, communication skills, content, clinical judgment, and humanistic qualities/professionalism, before and after the implementation of the standardized verbal handover tool, SAFETIPS [1]. A nonvalidated faculty observation tool was utilized to evaluate residents’ ability to prioritize and organize verbal handoff. Residents completed a qualitative survey evaluating perceptions of handover. Patient outcome parameters were measured before and after implementation of the handover curriculum. Results: All faculty ratings of resident handoff significantly improved, with mean changes ranging from 1.2 to 1.9 points (p < 0.05 for all questions, n = 11). Using matched data, handover times in minutes per patient did not change significantly. Average scores from the nonvalidated questions improved to 0.45 (n = 11, p = 0.24, CI = −0.36–1.27). Pre- and post-intervention periods did not differ significantly on the rates of patient outcome parameters. Residents reported the standardized handover system made verbal handover more concise, complete, and accurate. Conclusions: Formalized handover curriculum significantly improved key areas of resident handover including organization/efficiency, communication skills, content, clinical judgment, and humanistic qualities/professionalism but failed to show improvements in selected objective patient outcome measures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)281-293
Number of pages13
JournalMedical Science Educator
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017

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Curriculum
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
resident
curriculum
Clinical Competence
Efficiency
Patient Handoff
Communication
Aptitude
communication skills
efficiency
organization
Observation
rating
ability
Professionalism
evaluation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Education

Cite this

Aprile, Justen M. ; Reed, Ben D. ; Baskar, Shankar ; Aprile, Bettina M. ; Krishna, Sangeeta. / Resident Handover : Need for Structured Curriculum and Quality Outcome Studies. In: Medical Science Educator. 2017 ; Vol. 27, No. 2. pp. 281-293.
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Resident Handover : Need for Structured Curriculum and Quality Outcome Studies. / Aprile, Justen M.; Reed, Ben D.; Baskar, Shankar; Aprile, Bettina M.; Krishna, Sangeeta.

In: Medical Science Educator, Vol. 27, No. 2, 01.06.2017, p. 281-293.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Reed, Ben D.

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AU - Krishna, Sangeeta

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