RESIDENTIAL BURIAL ALONG the SOUTHERN STREET of the DEAD: SKELETONS and ISOTOPES

Rebecca Storey, Gina M. Buckley, Douglas J. Kennett

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Skeletal remains from Tlajinga 33 (33:S3W1) have been the focus of research in the southern sector of Teotihuacan since excavations took place in the 1980s. Recent excavations in Tlajinga Compounds 17 and 18 (17:S3E1 and 18:S3E1, respectively), located along the southern Street of the Dead, recovered nine additional skeletons. This article is a description of the burials from Compounds 17 and 18 and a comparative analysis of health, diet, and chronology across all three compounds (Compounds 17, 18, and 33). Here, we test the hypothesis that individuals between residential compounds at Tlajinga lived similar lives and that health and biogeochemical markers of individuals will reflect these similarities. Although the sample size is small, the paleopathological analysis of individuals at Compounds 17 and 18 indicates morbidity patterns similar to Tlajinga 33, but also that these residents were perhaps less susceptible to stressors during periods of juvenile growth. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes suggest that, overall, diets were analogous across compounds, but Compounds 17 and 18 were able to supplement their diet with a greater variety of plant resources. There were no clear dietary differences between higher and lower status individuals, however. Finally, accelerated mass spectrometry radiocarbon (AMS 14C) dates indicate that residential living may have occurred later at Compound 18 than at Compound 17 and Tlajinga 33.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)147-161
Number of pages15
JournalAncient Mesoamerica
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

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diet
excavation
skeletal remains
nitrogen isotope
accelerator mass spectrometry
morbidity
skeleton
carbon isotope
chronology
stable isotope
mass spectrometry
health
funeral
supplement
resident
resources
analysis
test
marker
plant resource

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Storey, Rebecca ; Buckley, Gina M. ; Kennett, Douglas J. / RESIDENTIAL BURIAL ALONG the SOUTHERN STREET of the DEAD : SKELETONS and ISOTOPES. In: Ancient Mesoamerica. 2019 ; Vol. 30, No. 1. pp. 147-161.
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abstract = "Skeletal remains from Tlajinga 33 (33:S3W1) have been the focus of research in the southern sector of Teotihuacan since excavations took place in the 1980s. Recent excavations in Tlajinga Compounds 17 and 18 (17:S3E1 and 18:S3E1, respectively), located along the southern Street of the Dead, recovered nine additional skeletons. This article is a description of the burials from Compounds 17 and 18 and a comparative analysis of health, diet, and chronology across all three compounds (Compounds 17, 18, and 33). Here, we test the hypothesis that individuals between residential compounds at Tlajinga lived similar lives and that health and biogeochemical markers of individuals will reflect these similarities. Although the sample size is small, the paleopathological analysis of individuals at Compounds 17 and 18 indicates morbidity patterns similar to Tlajinga 33, but also that these residents were perhaps less susceptible to stressors during periods of juvenile growth. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotopes suggest that, overall, diets were analogous across compounds, but Compounds 17 and 18 were able to supplement their diet with a greater variety of plant resources. There were no clear dietary differences between higher and lower status individuals, however. Finally, accelerated mass spectrometry radiocarbon (AMS 14C) dates indicate that residential living may have occurred later at Compound 18 than at Compound 17 and Tlajinga 33.",
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RESIDENTIAL BURIAL ALONG the SOUTHERN STREET of the DEAD : SKELETONS and ISOTOPES. / Storey, Rebecca; Buckley, Gina M.; Kennett, Douglas J.

In: Ancient Mesoamerica, Vol. 30, No. 1, 01.03.2019, p. 147-161.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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