Responding to Bullying Victimization: Comparative Analysis of Victimized Students in General and Special Education

Michael T. Hartley, Sheri Bauman, Charisse Nixon, Stan Davis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Focused on 3,305 students who self-reported frequent bullying victimization, this study compared the use and effectiveness of responses to address bullying victimization among students in special education, as compared with students in general education. Students in special education were less likely to make a joke, but more likely to tell the aggressor how they felt, hit the aggressor, and tell an adult at school and home, according to self-report. Furthermore, students in special education were significantly more likely to report that “things got worse” after using each response. Implications for educational policy and future research are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)77-89
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Disability Policy Studies
Volume28
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

Fingerprint

Bullying
Special Education
Crime Victims
general education
special education
victimization
exclusion
Students
student
joke
educational policy
Self Report
Education
school

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Law

Cite this

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Responding to Bullying Victimization : Comparative Analysis of Victimized Students in General and Special Education. / Hartley, Michael T.; Bauman, Sheri; Nixon, Charisse; Davis, Stan.

In: Journal of Disability Policy Studies, Vol. 28, No. 2, 01.09.2017, p. 77-89.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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