Response of layer breeders to dietary acetylsalicylic acid. 3. Effects on fertility and hatchability of embryos exposed to control and elevated incubation temperatures.

C. D. McDaniel, J. M. Balog, M. Freed, R. G. Elkin, R. H. Wellenreiter, T. Kuczek, P. Y. Hester

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Because acetylsalicylic acid (ASA, aspirin) is a common antipyretic drug, there has been considerable research on the effects of ASA on mammalian embryonic development. However, very limited research has been conducted on the effects of ASA on avian development and hatchability. The present study investigated the effect of dietary ASA on fertility and hatchability and whether embryos of breeder hens fed ASA, as compared with embryos of hens fed a control diet, would survive elevated temperatures during incubation. White Leghorn layer breeders were fed 0, .025, .050, .100, .200, and .400% ASA for the first 13 mo of egg production. When averaged over 13 mo, hens fed .40% dietary ASA demonstrated a decline in fertility (P < .03), hatchability of fertile eggs (P < .04), and hatchability of eggs set (P < .02). Chicks from hens fed .10% ASA weighed more than chicks from hens receiving 0, .025, .20, or .40% ASA (P < .01). When embryos were incubated at elevated temperatures of 42.8 or 43.3 C for 5.5 to 12 h on Day 16 of incubation, hatchability declined. Also, ASA fed to layer breeders did not improve hatchability of embryos exposed to elevated incubation temperatures when compared with embryos exposed to a control incubation temperature (37.2 C). During Month 9 of production, chicks from hens fed .05 and .10% ASA and exposed to an elevated temperature of 42.8 C for 9 h on Day 16 of incubation weighed more than similarly heat-stressed chicks of hens fed 0, .20, or .40% ASA (temperature by diet interaction, P < .03).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1100-1108
Number of pages9
JournalPoultry science
Volume72
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1993

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Animal Science and Zoology

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