Results after partial left ventriculectomy versus heart transplantation for idiopathic cardiomyopathy

S. W. Etoch, S. C. Koenig, M. A. Laureano, P. Cerrito, L. A. Gray, Robert Dowling, S. Gundry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Partial left ventriculectomy has been introduced as an alternative surgical therapy to heart transplantation. We performed a single- center, retrospective analysis of all patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy who underwent partial left ventriculectomy or heart transplantation or who were listed for transplantation to determine operative mortality rate, 12-mouth survival, freedom from death on the heart transplantation waiting list, and freedom from death or need for relisting for heart transplantation. Methods: Patients who had partial left ventriculectomy (October 1996 to April 1998) were retrospectively compared with patients who were listed for heart transplantation (January 1995 to April 1998). Survival was assessed after the surgical procedure (partial left ventriculectomy vs heart transplantation) and from time of listing for heart transplantation to assess the additional impact of waiting list deaths. Freedom from death or relisting for heart transplantation was also compared. Results: There was no difference in age or United Network for Organ Sharing status between the 2 groups. Twenty-nine patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy were listed for heart transplantation; 17 patients underwent transplantation, 6 patients died while on the waiting list, and 6 patients remain listed. One patient died after heart transplantation, and 1 patient required relisting. Sixteen patients had partial left ventriculectomy; 10 patients are in improved condition, 2 patients died (1 death early from sepsis and 1 death from progressive heart failure), and 4 patients required relisting for heart transplantation. Operative survival was 94% after partial left ventriculectomy and 94% after heart transplantation (P = .92). Postoperative 12-month Kaplan-Meier survival was 86% after partial left ventriculectomy and 93 % after heart transplantation (P = .90). Twelvemonth Kaplan-Meier survival after listing for heart transplantation was 75% due to death while on the waiting list (P = .76). Freedom from death or need for relisting for heart transplantation was 56% after partial left ventriculectomy and 86% after transplantation (P = .063). Conclusion: Operative and 12-month survival after partial left ventriculectomy and heart transplantation were comparable. However, despite their initial improvement, many patients who underwent partial left ventriculectomy required relisting for transplantation. Although partial left ventriculectomy is associated with acceptable operative and 12-month survival, it may prove to serve better as a bridge to transplantation in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy rather than definitive therapy, given the number of patients who required relisting for transplantation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)952-959
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume117
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

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Heart Transplantation
Cardiomyopathies
Waiting Lists
Transplantation
Survival
Dilated Cardiomyopathy
Complementary Therapies
Mouth

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Etoch, S. W. ; Koenig, S. C. ; Laureano, M. A. ; Cerrito, P. ; Gray, L. A. ; Dowling, Robert ; Gundry, S. / Results after partial left ventriculectomy versus heart transplantation for idiopathic cardiomyopathy. In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery. 1999 ; Vol. 117, No. 5. pp. 952-959.
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abstract = "Objective: Partial left ventriculectomy has been introduced as an alternative surgical therapy to heart transplantation. We performed a single- center, retrospective analysis of all patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy who underwent partial left ventriculectomy or heart transplantation or who were listed for transplantation to determine operative mortality rate, 12-mouth survival, freedom from death on the heart transplantation waiting list, and freedom from death or need for relisting for heart transplantation. Methods: Patients who had partial left ventriculectomy (October 1996 to April 1998) were retrospectively compared with patients who were listed for heart transplantation (January 1995 to April 1998). Survival was assessed after the surgical procedure (partial left ventriculectomy vs heart transplantation) and from time of listing for heart transplantation to assess the additional impact of waiting list deaths. Freedom from death or relisting for heart transplantation was also compared. Results: There was no difference in age or United Network for Organ Sharing status between the 2 groups. Twenty-nine patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy were listed for heart transplantation; 17 patients underwent transplantation, 6 patients died while on the waiting list, and 6 patients remain listed. One patient died after heart transplantation, and 1 patient required relisting. Sixteen patients had partial left ventriculectomy; 10 patients are in improved condition, 2 patients died (1 death early from sepsis and 1 death from progressive heart failure), and 4 patients required relisting for heart transplantation. Operative survival was 94{\%} after partial left ventriculectomy and 94{\%} after heart transplantation (P = .92). Postoperative 12-month Kaplan-Meier survival was 86{\%} after partial left ventriculectomy and 93 {\%} after heart transplantation (P = .90). Twelvemonth Kaplan-Meier survival after listing for heart transplantation was 75{\%} due to death while on the waiting list (P = .76). Freedom from death or need for relisting for heart transplantation was 56{\%} after partial left ventriculectomy and 86{\%} after transplantation (P = .063). Conclusion: Operative and 12-month survival after partial left ventriculectomy and heart transplantation were comparable. However, despite their initial improvement, many patients who underwent partial left ventriculectomy required relisting for transplantation. Although partial left ventriculectomy is associated with acceptable operative and 12-month survival, it may prove to serve better as a bridge to transplantation in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy rather than definitive therapy, given the number of patients who required relisting for transplantation.",
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Results after partial left ventriculectomy versus heart transplantation for idiopathic cardiomyopathy. / Etoch, S. W.; Koenig, S. C.; Laureano, M. A.; Cerrito, P.; Gray, L. A.; Dowling, Robert; Gundry, S.

In: Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Vol. 117, No. 5, 01.01.1999, p. 952-959.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Results after partial left ventriculectomy versus heart transplantation for idiopathic cardiomyopathy

AU - Etoch, S. W.

AU - Koenig, S. C.

AU - Laureano, M. A.

AU - Cerrito, P.

AU - Gray, L. A.

AU - Dowling, Robert

AU - Gundry, S.

PY - 1999/1/1

Y1 - 1999/1/1

N2 - Objective: Partial left ventriculectomy has been introduced as an alternative surgical therapy to heart transplantation. We performed a single- center, retrospective analysis of all patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy who underwent partial left ventriculectomy or heart transplantation or who were listed for transplantation to determine operative mortality rate, 12-mouth survival, freedom from death on the heart transplantation waiting list, and freedom from death or need for relisting for heart transplantation. Methods: Patients who had partial left ventriculectomy (October 1996 to April 1998) were retrospectively compared with patients who were listed for heart transplantation (January 1995 to April 1998). Survival was assessed after the surgical procedure (partial left ventriculectomy vs heart transplantation) and from time of listing for heart transplantation to assess the additional impact of waiting list deaths. Freedom from death or relisting for heart transplantation was also compared. Results: There was no difference in age or United Network for Organ Sharing status between the 2 groups. Twenty-nine patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy were listed for heart transplantation; 17 patients underwent transplantation, 6 patients died while on the waiting list, and 6 patients remain listed. One patient died after heart transplantation, and 1 patient required relisting. Sixteen patients had partial left ventriculectomy; 10 patients are in improved condition, 2 patients died (1 death early from sepsis and 1 death from progressive heart failure), and 4 patients required relisting for heart transplantation. Operative survival was 94% after partial left ventriculectomy and 94% after heart transplantation (P = .92). Postoperative 12-month Kaplan-Meier survival was 86% after partial left ventriculectomy and 93 % after heart transplantation (P = .90). Twelvemonth Kaplan-Meier survival after listing for heart transplantation was 75% due to death while on the waiting list (P = .76). Freedom from death or need for relisting for heart transplantation was 56% after partial left ventriculectomy and 86% after transplantation (P = .063). Conclusion: Operative and 12-month survival after partial left ventriculectomy and heart transplantation were comparable. However, despite their initial improvement, many patients who underwent partial left ventriculectomy required relisting for transplantation. Although partial left ventriculectomy is associated with acceptable operative and 12-month survival, it may prove to serve better as a bridge to transplantation in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy rather than definitive therapy, given the number of patients who required relisting for transplantation.

AB - Objective: Partial left ventriculectomy has been introduced as an alternative surgical therapy to heart transplantation. We performed a single- center, retrospective analysis of all patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy who underwent partial left ventriculectomy or heart transplantation or who were listed for transplantation to determine operative mortality rate, 12-mouth survival, freedom from death on the heart transplantation waiting list, and freedom from death or need for relisting for heart transplantation. Methods: Patients who had partial left ventriculectomy (October 1996 to April 1998) were retrospectively compared with patients who were listed for heart transplantation (January 1995 to April 1998). Survival was assessed after the surgical procedure (partial left ventriculectomy vs heart transplantation) and from time of listing for heart transplantation to assess the additional impact of waiting list deaths. Freedom from death or relisting for heart transplantation was also compared. Results: There was no difference in age or United Network for Organ Sharing status between the 2 groups. Twenty-nine patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy were listed for heart transplantation; 17 patients underwent transplantation, 6 patients died while on the waiting list, and 6 patients remain listed. One patient died after heart transplantation, and 1 patient required relisting. Sixteen patients had partial left ventriculectomy; 10 patients are in improved condition, 2 patients died (1 death early from sepsis and 1 death from progressive heart failure), and 4 patients required relisting for heart transplantation. Operative survival was 94% after partial left ventriculectomy and 94% after heart transplantation (P = .92). Postoperative 12-month Kaplan-Meier survival was 86% after partial left ventriculectomy and 93 % after heart transplantation (P = .90). Twelvemonth Kaplan-Meier survival after listing for heart transplantation was 75% due to death while on the waiting list (P = .76). Freedom from death or need for relisting for heart transplantation was 56% after partial left ventriculectomy and 86% after transplantation (P = .063). Conclusion: Operative and 12-month survival after partial left ventriculectomy and heart transplantation were comparable. However, despite their initial improvement, many patients who underwent partial left ventriculectomy required relisting for transplantation. Although partial left ventriculectomy is associated with acceptable operative and 12-month survival, it may prove to serve better as a bridge to transplantation in patients with idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy rather than definitive therapy, given the number of patients who required relisting for transplantation.

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