Results of a survey of infectious disease testing practices by organ procurement organizations in the United States

Ronald E. Domen, Kristine A. Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Information related to infectious disease testing policies and practices of organ procurement organizations in the United States does not currently exist. Methods. A total of 63 organ procurement organizations in the United States were surveyed during May 1996. Participants responded to a detailed questionnaire concerning infectious disease tests performed for tissue and solid organ donors and policies related to the reporting and notification of positive test results. Results. The response rate was 77.8%. The majority of testing is performed by hospital laboratories with an expected turnaround time of 5 hr or less by 71% of organ procurement organizations. Almost all routinely perform screening tests for human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus, cytomegalovirus, syphilis, human T lymphocyte virus I, and hepatitis B surface antigen. Other tests are performed with greater variability. Although the majority of organ procurement organizations perform confirmatory tests when screening tests are positive, 35% do not perform confirmatory testing or do so only sporadically. There are a wide range of policies concerning the subsequent reporting of positive infectious disease tests and to whom results should be reported. Conclusions. Infectious disease testing policies of organ procurement organizations, particularly for solid organs, demonstrate variability in interpretation and perceived significance of positive test results, the initiation or need for reflex and confirmatory testing, the reporting of positive results, and to whom positive test results should be reported. There is a need for a consistent national policy for appropriate infectious disease testing and reporting of results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1790-1794
Number of pages5
JournalTransplantation
Volume63
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 27 1997

Fingerprint

Tissue and Organ Procurement
Communicable Diseases
Organizations
Disease Notification
Hospital Laboratories
Syphilis
Hepatitis B Surface Antigens
Cytomegalovirus
Hepacivirus
Reflex
Surveys and Questionnaires
Tissue Donors
HIV
Viruses
T-Lymphocytes

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Transplantation

Cite this

@article{5640d30364804513a9df4ddfb230377f,
title = "Results of a survey of infectious disease testing practices by organ procurement organizations in the United States",
abstract = "Background. Information related to infectious disease testing policies and practices of organ procurement organizations in the United States does not currently exist. Methods. A total of 63 organ procurement organizations in the United States were surveyed during May 1996. Participants responded to a detailed questionnaire concerning infectious disease tests performed for tissue and solid organ donors and policies related to the reporting and notification of positive test results. Results. The response rate was 77.8{\%}. The majority of testing is performed by hospital laboratories with an expected turnaround time of 5 hr or less by 71{\%} of organ procurement organizations. Almost all routinely perform screening tests for human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus, cytomegalovirus, syphilis, human T lymphocyte virus I, and hepatitis B surface antigen. Other tests are performed with greater variability. Although the majority of organ procurement organizations perform confirmatory tests when screening tests are positive, 35{\%} do not perform confirmatory testing or do so only sporadically. There are a wide range of policies concerning the subsequent reporting of positive infectious disease tests and to whom results should be reported. Conclusions. Infectious disease testing policies of organ procurement organizations, particularly for solid organs, demonstrate variability in interpretation and perceived significance of positive test results, the initiation or need for reflex and confirmatory testing, the reporting of positive results, and to whom positive test results should be reported. There is a need for a consistent national policy for appropriate infectious disease testing and reporting of results.",
author = "Domen, {Ronald E.} and Nelson, {Kristine A.}",
year = "1997",
month = "6",
day = "27",
doi = "10.1097/00007890-199706270-00014",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "63",
pages = "1790--1794",
journal = "Transplantation",
issn = "0041-1337",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "12",

}

Results of a survey of infectious disease testing practices by organ procurement organizations in the United States. / Domen, Ronald E.; Nelson, Kristine A.

In: Transplantation, Vol. 63, No. 12, 27.06.1997, p. 1790-1794.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Results of a survey of infectious disease testing practices by organ procurement organizations in the United States

AU - Domen, Ronald E.

AU - Nelson, Kristine A.

PY - 1997/6/27

Y1 - 1997/6/27

N2 - Background. Information related to infectious disease testing policies and practices of organ procurement organizations in the United States does not currently exist. Methods. A total of 63 organ procurement organizations in the United States were surveyed during May 1996. Participants responded to a detailed questionnaire concerning infectious disease tests performed for tissue and solid organ donors and policies related to the reporting and notification of positive test results. Results. The response rate was 77.8%. The majority of testing is performed by hospital laboratories with an expected turnaround time of 5 hr or less by 71% of organ procurement organizations. Almost all routinely perform screening tests for human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus, cytomegalovirus, syphilis, human T lymphocyte virus I, and hepatitis B surface antigen. Other tests are performed with greater variability. Although the majority of organ procurement organizations perform confirmatory tests when screening tests are positive, 35% do not perform confirmatory testing or do so only sporadically. There are a wide range of policies concerning the subsequent reporting of positive infectious disease tests and to whom results should be reported. Conclusions. Infectious disease testing policies of organ procurement organizations, particularly for solid organs, demonstrate variability in interpretation and perceived significance of positive test results, the initiation or need for reflex and confirmatory testing, the reporting of positive results, and to whom positive test results should be reported. There is a need for a consistent national policy for appropriate infectious disease testing and reporting of results.

AB - Background. Information related to infectious disease testing policies and practices of organ procurement organizations in the United States does not currently exist. Methods. A total of 63 organ procurement organizations in the United States were surveyed during May 1996. Participants responded to a detailed questionnaire concerning infectious disease tests performed for tissue and solid organ donors and policies related to the reporting and notification of positive test results. Results. The response rate was 77.8%. The majority of testing is performed by hospital laboratories with an expected turnaround time of 5 hr or less by 71% of organ procurement organizations. Almost all routinely perform screening tests for human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus, cytomegalovirus, syphilis, human T lymphocyte virus I, and hepatitis B surface antigen. Other tests are performed with greater variability. Although the majority of organ procurement organizations perform confirmatory tests when screening tests are positive, 35% do not perform confirmatory testing or do so only sporadically. There are a wide range of policies concerning the subsequent reporting of positive infectious disease tests and to whom results should be reported. Conclusions. Infectious disease testing policies of organ procurement organizations, particularly for solid organs, demonstrate variability in interpretation and perceived significance of positive test results, the initiation or need for reflex and confirmatory testing, the reporting of positive results, and to whom positive test results should be reported. There is a need for a consistent national policy for appropriate infectious disease testing and reporting of results.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030923956&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030923956&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/00007890-199706270-00014

DO - 10.1097/00007890-199706270-00014

M3 - Article

C2 - 9210505

AN - SCOPUS:0030923956

VL - 63

SP - 1790

EP - 1794

JO - Transplantation

JF - Transplantation

SN - 0041-1337

IS - 12

ER -