Resuspension of bacterial spore particles from duct surfaces

Paricheher Salimifard, Paul Kremer, Donghyun Rim, James Freihaut

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Allergen-containing particles resuspended from building floors or outdoor-air-entrained particulates can deposit on the surfaces of supply air ducts. These particles can later be resuspended into the supply air because of duct vibration and turbulent flow. This study investigates the resuspension rates of bacillus thuringiensis bacterial spore particles (0.4-25 μm) from a vibrating duct surface with air flow swirl velocities ranging from 0 to 2.5 m/sec. Resuspension rates increased by ∼ 2 orders of magnitude for all particle sizes in the 0.3-2.5 m/sec range of swirl velocities. One minute averaged resuspension rate ranged from 10-5 to 0.1/min. For particle sizes above about 10.0 microns, depending on swirl velocity magnitude, a relatively sharp drop-off in resuspension rate is observed. These results further indicate that the substantial spore residence time of nine months on the metal surfaces before conducting the resuspension disturbance experiments does not inhibit the resuspension propensity of the spores significantly.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages513-517
Number of pages5
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
EventHealthy Buildings 2015 America Conference: Innovation in a Time of Energy Uncertainty and Climate Adaptation, HB 2015 - Boulder, United States
Duration: Jul 19 2015Jul 22 2015

Other

OtherHealthy Buildings 2015 America Conference: Innovation in a Time of Energy Uncertainty and Climate Adaptation, HB 2015
CountryUnited States
CityBoulder
Period7/19/157/22/15

Fingerprint

Ducts
Air
Particle size
Allergens
Bacilli
Flow velocity
Turbulent flow
Deposits
Metals
Experiments

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Civil and Structural Engineering

Cite this

Salimifard, P., Kremer, P., Rim, D., & Freihaut, J. (2015). Resuspension of bacterial spore particles from duct surfaces. 513-517. Paper presented at Healthy Buildings 2015 America Conference: Innovation in a Time of Energy Uncertainty and Climate Adaptation, HB 2015, Boulder, United States.
Salimifard, Paricheher ; Kremer, Paul ; Rim, Donghyun ; Freihaut, James. / Resuspension of bacterial spore particles from duct surfaces. Paper presented at Healthy Buildings 2015 America Conference: Innovation in a Time of Energy Uncertainty and Climate Adaptation, HB 2015, Boulder, United States.5 p.
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Salimifard, P, Kremer, P, Rim, D & Freihaut, J 2015, 'Resuspension of bacterial spore particles from duct surfaces' Paper presented at Healthy Buildings 2015 America Conference: Innovation in a Time of Energy Uncertainty and Climate Adaptation, HB 2015, Boulder, United States, 7/19/15 - 7/22/15, pp. 513-517.

Resuspension of bacterial spore particles from duct surfaces. / Salimifard, Paricheher; Kremer, Paul; Rim, Donghyun; Freihaut, James.

2015. 513-517 Paper presented at Healthy Buildings 2015 America Conference: Innovation in a Time of Energy Uncertainty and Climate Adaptation, HB 2015, Boulder, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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Salimifard P, Kremer P, Rim D, Freihaut J. Resuspension of bacterial spore particles from duct surfaces. 2015. Paper presented at Healthy Buildings 2015 America Conference: Innovation in a Time of Energy Uncertainty and Climate Adaptation, HB 2015, Boulder, United States.