Retinal ganglion cells in diabetes

Timothy S. Kern, Alistair Barber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

246 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Diabetic retinopathy has long been recognized as a vascular disease that develops in most patients, and it was believed that the visual dysfunction that develops in some diabetics was due to the vascular lesions used to characterize the disease. It is becoming increasingly clear that neuronal cells of the retina also are affected by diabetes, resulting in dysfunction and even degeneration of some neuronal cells. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are the best studied of the retinal neurons with respect to the effect of diabetes. Although investigations are providing new information about RGCs in diabetes, including therapies to inhibit the neurodegeneration, critical information about the function, anatomy and response properties of these cells is yet needed to understand the relationship between RGC changes and visual dysfunction in diabetes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4401-4408
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Physiology
Volume586
Issue number18
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 22 2008

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Retinal Ganglion Cells
Retinal Neurons
Diabetic Retinopathy
Vascular Diseases
Blood Vessels
Retina
Anatomy
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology

Cite this

Kern, Timothy S. ; Barber, Alistair. / Retinal ganglion cells in diabetes. In: Journal of Physiology. 2008 ; Vol. 586, No. 18. pp. 4401-4408.
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Retinal ganglion cells in diabetes. / Kern, Timothy S.; Barber, Alistair.

In: Journal of Physiology, Vol. 586, No. 18, 22.09.2008, p. 4401-4408.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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