Retroactive enhancement of a skin sensation by a delayed cortical stimulus in man: Evidence for delay of a conscious sensory experience

B. Libet, E. W. Wright, B. Feinstein, Dennis Keith Pearl

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sensation elicited by a skin stimulus (S) was subjectively reported to feel stronger when followed by a stimulus to somatosensory cerebral cortex (C), even when C was delayed by up to 400 ms or more. This expands the potentiality for retroactive effects beyond that previously known as backward masking. It also demonstrates that the content of a sensory experience can be altered by another cerebral input introduced after the sensory signal arrives at the cortex. The long effective S-C intervals support the thesis that a duration of cortical activity of up to 0.5 s is required before awareness of a sensory stimulus is developed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)367-375
Number of pages9
JournalConsciousness and Cognition
Volume1
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

Fingerprint

Somatosensory Cortex
Cerebral Cortex
Skin

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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Retroactive enhancement of a skin sensation by a delayed cortical stimulus in man : Evidence for delay of a conscious sensory experience. / Libet, B.; Wright, E. W.; Feinstein, B.; Pearl, Dennis Keith.

In: Consciousness and Cognition, Vol. 1, No. 3, 01.01.1992, p. 367-375.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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