Return migration in Africa and the relationship between educational attainment and labor market success: Evidence from Uganda

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The return migration of skilled professionals has been suggested as a policy instrument suitable for reversing the large-scale emigration of skilled professionals from African countries. However, there are no empirical studies showing how migrant professionals from Africa are reintegrated into the labor market after they return. This study examines the relationship between educational attainment and the likelihood of employment among native-born African migrants returning home from abroad. The study focuses on the evidence from Uganda since this country has one of the longest histories of skilled migration in Africa. The results show that returning migrants with university degrees and vocational credentials are more likely to be employed than their nonmigrant and immigrant counterparts. However, this employment advantage was not observed among returning migrants with secondary schooling or below. Furthermore, the results show that returning migrants are generally more likely to be employed as district employment rates increase.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)652-674
Number of pages23
JournalInternational Migration Review
Volume42
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 18 2008

Fingerprint

Uganda
labor market
migrant
migration
evidence
emigration
immigrant
Return Migration
Labour Market
Education
Africa
Migrants
district
university
history

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Demography
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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