Review of building science application in selected DOE race to zero student design competition projects

Ehsan Kamel, Ali M. Memari

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Zero energy ready homes are expected to significantly reduce the energy consumption in residential buildings that are responsible for about 20% of total annual energy use in the U.S. Two of the major aspects of a net-zero energy home or zero energy ready home include high-performance building design and renewable power generating systems such as photovoltaic panels. Implementing building science essentials in building envelope design and construction can lead to higher performance in terms of more energy efficient design, better moisture/water control, and higher durability, as some of the main benefits. Because teaching of building science principles and applications to building enclosure have not been part of traditional curricula in college majors dealing with design and construction of buildings, significant effort has been undertaken over the past decade to promote incorporation of such principles in formal education for college students and also continuing education for practicing professionals. Over the past five years, the U.S. Department of Energy has organized a new annual student design competition focused on designing a high-performance building, which will be evaluated based on different criteria including energy performance, building envelope performance, and durability. For example, for buildings under the residential category, the competition teams are required to achieve at least the DOE Zero Energy Ready Home energy performance level. One of the objectives of the outcomes of this competition is for builders to benefit from the results of the competition projects for practical application, which can then help toward the goal of energy saving. The main objective of this paper is to develop an understanding of the level of building science principles employed and incorporated in some of the competition projects, which will give an indication of the level of preparedness of students who worked on those projects with respect to the building science principles entering the competition. In this paper, the building envelope systems designed and specified by a selected number of winning teams are reviewed and categorized as appropriate. Of particular interest is to determine the basis for the selection of high-performance building envelope types and design specifications, which would indicate the team's understanding of the alternatives and selection process. The study will also show the effectiveness of different designs, systems, and materials used on the energy performance of competition buildings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAEI 2019
Subtitle of host publicationIntegrated Building Solutions - The National Agenda - Proceedings of the Architectural Engineering National Conference 2019
EditorsMoses D. F. Ling, Robert M. Leicht, Ryan L. Solnosky
PublisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)
Pages86-94
Number of pages9
ISBN (Electronic)9780784482261
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
EventArchitectural Engineering National Conference 2019: Integrated Building Solutions - The National Agenda, AEI 2019 - Tysons, United States
Duration: Apr 3 2019Apr 6 2019

Publication series

NameAEI 2019: Integrated Building Solutions - The National Agenda - Proceedings of the Architectural Engineering National Conference 2019

Conference

ConferenceArchitectural Engineering National Conference 2019: Integrated Building Solutions - The National Agenda, AEI 2019
CountryUnited States
CityTysons
Period4/3/194/6/19

Fingerprint

Students
Durability
Education
Enclosures
Curricula
Energy conservation
Teaching
Moisture
Energy utilization
Specifications
Water

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction
  • Architecture

Cite this

Kamel, E., & Memari, A. M. (2019). Review of building science application in selected DOE race to zero student design competition projects. In M. D. F. Ling, R. M. Leicht, & R. L. Solnosky (Eds.), AEI 2019: Integrated Building Solutions - The National Agenda - Proceedings of the Architectural Engineering National Conference 2019 (pp. 86-94). (AEI 2019: Integrated Building Solutions - The National Agenda - Proceedings of the Architectural Engineering National Conference 2019). American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784482261.011
Kamel, Ehsan ; Memari, Ali M. / Review of building science application in selected DOE race to zero student design competition projects. AEI 2019: Integrated Building Solutions - The National Agenda - Proceedings of the Architectural Engineering National Conference 2019. editor / Moses D. F. Ling ; Robert M. Leicht ; Ryan L. Solnosky. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2019. pp. 86-94 (AEI 2019: Integrated Building Solutions - The National Agenda - Proceedings of the Architectural Engineering National Conference 2019).
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Kamel, E & Memari, AM 2019, Review of building science application in selected DOE race to zero student design competition projects. in MDF Ling, RM Leicht & RL Solnosky (eds), AEI 2019: Integrated Building Solutions - The National Agenda - Proceedings of the Architectural Engineering National Conference 2019. AEI 2019: Integrated Building Solutions - The National Agenda - Proceedings of the Architectural Engineering National Conference 2019, American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), pp. 86-94, Architectural Engineering National Conference 2019: Integrated Building Solutions - The National Agenda, AEI 2019, Tysons, United States, 4/3/19. https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784482261.011

Review of building science application in selected DOE race to zero student design competition projects. / Kamel, Ehsan; Memari, Ali M.

AEI 2019: Integrated Building Solutions - The National Agenda - Proceedings of the Architectural Engineering National Conference 2019. ed. / Moses D. F. Ling; Robert M. Leicht; Ryan L. Solnosky. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2019. p. 86-94 (AEI 2019: Integrated Building Solutions - The National Agenda - Proceedings of the Architectural Engineering National Conference 2019).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Kamel E, Memari AM. Review of building science application in selected DOE race to zero student design competition projects. In Ling MDF, Leicht RM, Solnosky RL, editors, AEI 2019: Integrated Building Solutions - The National Agenda - Proceedings of the Architectural Engineering National Conference 2019. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). 2019. p. 86-94. (AEI 2019: Integrated Building Solutions - The National Agenda - Proceedings of the Architectural Engineering National Conference 2019). https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784482261.011