Revisiting Prison Privatization: An Examination of the Magnitude of Prison Privatization

Younhee Kim, Byron E. Price

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines the effects of capacity-oriented and institutional-based factors on the proliferation of prison privatization by extending the first generation of empirical research. This study found that correction expenditures, prison capacity, and regional identity are factors that significantly affect the magnitude of prison privatization, whereas political pressures, government ideology, and unionization were found not to have a significant influence on the growth of private prisons. The results imply that, once adopted, prison privatization became institutionalized over time and suggest that state governments should develop well-structured evaluation systems for private prisons to ensure and maintain effective correction management.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)255-275
Number of pages21
JournalAdministration and Society
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

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privatization
correctional institution
examination
regional identity
first generation
proliferation
Privatization
Prison
empirical research
expenditures
ideology
evaluation
management
Factors

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Public Administration
  • Marketing

Cite this

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Revisiting Prison Privatization : An Examination of the Magnitude of Prison Privatization. / Kim, Younhee; Price, Byron E.

In: Administration and Society, Vol. 46, No. 3, 01.01.2014, p. 255-275.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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