(Re)Writing local racial, ethnic, and cultural histories: Negotiating shared meaning in public rhetoric partnerships

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article describes a series of communitybased research projects, (Re)Writing Local Racial, Ethnic, and Cultural Histories, done in partnership with the local African American, Hispanic/Latino, and Jewish communities. The author argues that these projects are one substantive response to the ongoing, growing demand that English studies teacher-scholars and students participate in purposeful, impactful public work. These projects position students as rhetorical citizen historians who produce original historical and rhetorical knowledge and promote democracy through conscious, deliberate rhetorical historical work. But these partnerships also raise complex issues of unequal, fluid, and shifting discourses among community partners, students, and faculty and, consequently, inform ways to enact publicly shared meaning in community literacy partnerships.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)236-258
Number of pages23
JournalCollege English
Volume77
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

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cultural history
rhetoric
community
student
historian
research project
literacy
democracy
citizen
discourse
demand
teacher
Rhetoric
Cultural History
Ethnic History

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Language and Linguistics

Cite this

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(Re)Writing local racial, ethnic, and cultural histories : Negotiating shared meaning in public rhetoric partnerships. / Grobman, Laurie.

In: College English, Vol. 77, No. 3, 01.01.2015, p. 236-258.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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