RFLP mapping of QTLs conferring salt tolerance during the vegetative stage in tomato

Majid R. Foolad, F. Q. Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to salt tolerance during the vegetative stage in tomato were investigated using an interspecific backcross between a salt-sensitive Lycopersicon esculentum breeding line (NC84173, maternal and recurrent parent) and a salt-tolerant Lycopersicon pimpinellifolium accession (LA722). One hundred and nineteen BC1 individuals were genotyped for 151 RFLP markers and a linkage map was constructed. The parental lines and 119 BC1S1 families (self-pollinated progeny of the BC1 individuals) were evaluated for salt tolerance in aerated saline-solution cultures with the salt concentration gradually raised to 700 mM NaCl + 70 mM CaCl2 (equivalent to an electrical conductivity of approximately 64 dS/m and a water potential of approximately -35.2 bars). The two parental lines were distinctly different in salt tolerance: 80% of the LA722 plants versus 25% of the NC84173 plants survived for at least 2 weeks after the final salt concentration was reached. The BC1S1 population exhibited a continuous variation, typical of quantitative traits, with the survival rate of the BC1S1 families ranging from 9% to 94% with a mean of 51%. Two QTL mapping techniques, interval mapping (using MAPMAKER/QTL) and single-marker analysis (using QGENE), were used to identify QTLs. The results of both methods were similar and five QTLs were identified on chromosomes 1 (two QTLs), 3, 5 and 9. Each QTL accounted for between 5.7% and 17.7%, with the combined effects (of all five QTLs) exceeding 46%, of the total phenotypic variation. All QTLs had the positive QTL alleles from the salt-tolerant parent. Across QTLs, the effects were mainly additive in nature. Digenic epistatic interactions were evident among several QTL-linked and QTL-unlinked markers. The overall results indicate that tomato salt tolerance during the vegetative stage could be improved by marker-assisted selection using interspecific variation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)235-243
Number of pages9
JournalTheoretical and Applied Genetics
Volume99
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

Fingerprint

Salt-Tolerance
Quantitative Trait Loci
Lycopersicon esculentum
salt tolerance
Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms
vegetative growth
quantitative trait loci
restriction fragment length polymorphism
tomatoes
Salts
salts
salt concentration
sodium chloride
Solanum pimpinellifolium
Electric Conductivity
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 1
breeding lines
quantitative traits
interspecific variation
phenotypic variation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Genetics

Cite this

@article{bba3cc989a1a413daaf6bf18523391d8,
title = "RFLP mapping of QTLs conferring salt tolerance during the vegetative stage in tomato",
abstract = "Quantitative trait loci (QTLs) contributing to salt tolerance during the vegetative stage in tomato were investigated using an interspecific backcross between a salt-sensitive Lycopersicon esculentum breeding line (NC84173, maternal and recurrent parent) and a salt-tolerant Lycopersicon pimpinellifolium accession (LA722). One hundred and nineteen BC1 individuals were genotyped for 151 RFLP markers and a linkage map was constructed. The parental lines and 119 BC1S1 families (self-pollinated progeny of the BC1 individuals) were evaluated for salt tolerance in aerated saline-solution cultures with the salt concentration gradually raised to 700 mM NaCl + 70 mM CaCl2 (equivalent to an electrical conductivity of approximately 64 dS/m and a water potential of approximately -35.2 bars). The two parental lines were distinctly different in salt tolerance: 80{\%} of the LA722 plants versus 25{\%} of the NC84173 plants survived for at least 2 weeks after the final salt concentration was reached. The BC1S1 population exhibited a continuous variation, typical of quantitative traits, with the survival rate of the BC1S1 families ranging from 9{\%} to 94{\%} with a mean of 51{\%}. Two QTL mapping techniques, interval mapping (using MAPMAKER/QTL) and single-marker analysis (using QGENE), were used to identify QTLs. The results of both methods were similar and five QTLs were identified on chromosomes 1 (two QTLs), 3, 5 and 9. Each QTL accounted for between 5.7{\%} and 17.7{\%}, with the combined effects (of all five QTLs) exceeding 46{\%}, of the total phenotypic variation. All QTLs had the positive QTL alleles from the salt-tolerant parent. Across QTLs, the effects were mainly additive in nature. Digenic epistatic interactions were evident among several QTL-linked and QTL-unlinked markers. The overall results indicate that tomato salt tolerance during the vegetative stage could be improved by marker-assisted selection using interspecific variation.",
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RFLP mapping of QTLs conferring salt tolerance during the vegetative stage in tomato. / Foolad, Majid R.; Chen, F. Q.

In: Theoretical and Applied Genetics, Vol. 99, No. 1-2, 01.01.1999, p. 235-243.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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