Rhetorical criticism and the challenges of bilateral argument

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To assume editorial responsibilities for Philosophy & Rhetoric after Henry W. Johnstone was to have assumed rather a lot. He was, for starters, a philospher, and I am not. This much appeared to bother Henry not a bit, and in fact it proved the occasion of many productive discussions and facilitated my apprenticeship in ways for which I am still grateful. By trade a rhetorical critic, I was particularly interested in what might be called philosophical style, and in what sense that style might differentiate itself from modes of expression that characterize my disciplinary conventions. Pressed on the subject, Henry observed that one such distinction turned on our respective ways of initiating an argument. Philosophers, he said, start their arguments in mid-sentence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPhilosophy and Rhetoric in Dialogue
Subtitle of host publicationRedrawing Their Intellectual Landscape
PublisherPenn State University Press
Pages108-118
Number of pages11
ISBN (Print)9780271027685
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007

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apprenticeship
critic
rhetoric
criticism
responsibility
philosophy
Rhetorical Criticism
Rhetoric
Responsibility
Apprenticeship
Philosopher
Philosophy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Browne, S. H. (2007). Rhetorical criticism and the challenges of bilateral argument. In Philosophy and Rhetoric in Dialogue: Redrawing Their Intellectual Landscape (pp. 108-118). Penn State University Press.
Browne, Stephen Howard. / Rhetorical criticism and the challenges of bilateral argument. Philosophy and Rhetoric in Dialogue: Redrawing Their Intellectual Landscape. Penn State University Press, 2007. pp. 108-118
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Browne, SH 2007, Rhetorical criticism and the challenges of bilateral argument. in Philosophy and Rhetoric in Dialogue: Redrawing Their Intellectual Landscape. Penn State University Press, pp. 108-118.

Rhetorical criticism and the challenges of bilateral argument. / Browne, Stephen Howard.

Philosophy and Rhetoric in Dialogue: Redrawing Their Intellectual Landscape. Penn State University Press, 2007. p. 108-118.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Browne SH. Rhetorical criticism and the challenges of bilateral argument. In Philosophy and Rhetoric in Dialogue: Redrawing Their Intellectual Landscape. Penn State University Press. 2007. p. 108-118