Risperidone use in children with Down syndrome, severe intellectual disability, and comorbid autistic spectrum disorders: A naturalistic study

George T. Capone, Parag Goyal, Marco Grados, Brandon Smith, Heather Kammann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We report on an open-label, naturalistic study using risperidone to treat disruptive behaviors and self-injury in children with Down syndrome, severe intellectual disability, and comorbid autism spectrum disorders (DS+ASDs). We hypothesized that hyperactivity and disruptive behaviors would improve in response to risperidone treatment consistent with previous studies of children with ASD. METHODS: Subjects were children (mean age, 7.8 ± 2.6 years), consisting of 20 males and three females identified through our outpatient Down Syndrome Clinic between 2000 and 2004. RESULTS: Using the Aberrant Behavior Checklist as the primary outcome measure, all five subscales showed significant improvement following risperidone treatment. The mean duration of treatment was 95.8 ± 16.8 days, and mean total daily dose was 0.66 ± 0.28 mg/day. The Hyperactivity, Stereotypy, and Lethargy subscale scores showed the most significant reduction (p < .001), followed by Irritability (p < .02), and Inappropriate Speech (p < .04). Children with disruptive behavior and self-injury showed the greatest improvement. Sleep quality improved for 88% of subjects with preexisting sleep disturbance. Subjects for whom a follow-up weight was available showed a mean weight increase of 2.8 ± 1.5 kg during the treatment period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings support our clinical impression of improvement on important target behaviors such as aggression, disruptiveness, self-injury, stereotypy, and social withdrawal. Low-dose risperidone appears to be well tolerated in children with DS+ASD, although concerns about weight gain and metabolic alterations may limit its usefulness over the long term in some children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)106-116
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2008

Fingerprint

Risperidone
Autistic Disorder
Down Syndrome
Intellectual Disability
Sleep
Wounds and Injuries
Weights and Measures
Lethargy
Therapeutics
Checklist
Aggression
Weight Gain
Outpatients
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Problem Behavior

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

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title = "Risperidone use in children with Down syndrome, severe intellectual disability, and comorbid autistic spectrum disorders: A naturalistic study",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: We report on an open-label, naturalistic study using risperidone to treat disruptive behaviors and self-injury in children with Down syndrome, severe intellectual disability, and comorbid autism spectrum disorders (DS+ASDs). We hypothesized that hyperactivity and disruptive behaviors would improve in response to risperidone treatment consistent with previous studies of children with ASD. METHODS: Subjects were children (mean age, 7.8 ± 2.6 years), consisting of 20 males and three females identified through our outpatient Down Syndrome Clinic between 2000 and 2004. RESULTS: Using the Aberrant Behavior Checklist as the primary outcome measure, all five subscales showed significant improvement following risperidone treatment. The mean duration of treatment was 95.8 ± 16.8 days, and mean total daily dose was 0.66 ± 0.28 mg/day. The Hyperactivity, Stereotypy, and Lethargy subscale scores showed the most significant reduction (p < .001), followed by Irritability (p < .02), and Inappropriate Speech (p < .04). Children with disruptive behavior and self-injury showed the greatest improvement. Sleep quality improved for 88{\%} of subjects with preexisting sleep disturbance. Subjects for whom a follow-up weight was available showed a mean weight increase of 2.8 ± 1.5 kg during the treatment period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings support our clinical impression of improvement on important target behaviors such as aggression, disruptiveness, self-injury, stereotypy, and social withdrawal. Low-dose risperidone appears to be well tolerated in children with DS+ASD, although concerns about weight gain and metabolic alterations may limit its usefulness over the long term in some children.",
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Risperidone use in children with Down syndrome, severe intellectual disability, and comorbid autistic spectrum disorders : A naturalistic study. / Capone, George T.; Goyal, Parag; Grados, Marco; Smith, Brandon; Kammann, Heather.

In: Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, Vol. 29, No. 2, 01.04.2008, p. 106-116.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Risperidone use in children with Down syndrome, severe intellectual disability, and comorbid autistic spectrum disorders

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AU - Capone, George T.

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AU - Grados, Marco

AU - Smith, Brandon

AU - Kammann, Heather

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N2 - OBJECTIVE: We report on an open-label, naturalistic study using risperidone to treat disruptive behaviors and self-injury in children with Down syndrome, severe intellectual disability, and comorbid autism spectrum disorders (DS+ASDs). We hypothesized that hyperactivity and disruptive behaviors would improve in response to risperidone treatment consistent with previous studies of children with ASD. METHODS: Subjects were children (mean age, 7.8 ± 2.6 years), consisting of 20 males and three females identified through our outpatient Down Syndrome Clinic between 2000 and 2004. RESULTS: Using the Aberrant Behavior Checklist as the primary outcome measure, all five subscales showed significant improvement following risperidone treatment. The mean duration of treatment was 95.8 ± 16.8 days, and mean total daily dose was 0.66 ± 0.28 mg/day. The Hyperactivity, Stereotypy, and Lethargy subscale scores showed the most significant reduction (p < .001), followed by Irritability (p < .02), and Inappropriate Speech (p < .04). Children with disruptive behavior and self-injury showed the greatest improvement. Sleep quality improved for 88% of subjects with preexisting sleep disturbance. Subjects for whom a follow-up weight was available showed a mean weight increase of 2.8 ± 1.5 kg during the treatment period. CONCLUSIONS: These findings support our clinical impression of improvement on important target behaviors such as aggression, disruptiveness, self-injury, stereotypy, and social withdrawal. Low-dose risperidone appears to be well tolerated in children with DS+ASD, although concerns about weight gain and metabolic alterations may limit its usefulness over the long term in some children.

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