Rituals, invented traditions, and shifting power

The role of communication in the history of stadium construction

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This study employs James Carey's ritual view of communication to better understand the broad issues and forces that have driven stadium building in North America. The role of the city as part of an imagined community offers one rationale to explain why competitive stadium building has unfolded in various eras of history. Hobsbawm's notion of "invented tradition" is offered as a mechanism to understand the recent emergence of retro ballpark construction. The role of communication technologies and changes in deeper social structures are discussed in explaining a shift that has occurred among political and commercial realms involved in the stadium-building process, as is the relevance of Carey's vision for more inclusive journalistic strategies that draw from the philosophy of John Dewey.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)310-330
Number of pages21
JournalJournal of Communication Inquiry
Volume31
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007

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Stadiums
social structure
religious behavior
communication technology
communication
Communication
history
community
philosophy
History
Stadium

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Cultural Studies
  • Communication
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

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