Rodent malaria parasites Plasmodium chabaudi and P. vinckei do not increase their rates of gametocytogenesis in response to mosquito probing

Dave Shutler, Sarah E. Reece, Adele Mullie, Peter F. Billingsley, Andrew F. Read

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

13 Scopus citations

Abstract

Several vector-borne infectious agents facultatively alter their life history strategies in response to local vector densities. Some evidence suggests that malaria parasites invest more heavily in transmission stage production (gametocytogenesis) when vectors are present. Such a strategy could rapidly increase malaria transmission rates, particularly when adult mosquitoes begin to appear after dry seasons. However, in contrast to a recent experiment with a rodent malaria (Plasmodium chabaudi), we found no change in gametocytogenesis in either P. chabaudi or in another rodent malaria, P. vinckei, when their mouse hosts were exposed to mosquitoes. Positive results in the earlier study may have been because mosquito-feeding caused anaemia in hosts, a known promoter of gametocytogenesis. The substantial evidence that malaria and a variety of other parasites facultatively alter transmission strategies in response to a variety of environmental influences makes our results surprising.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2397-2402
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume272
Issue number1579
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 22 2005

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Rodent malaria parasites Plasmodium chabaudi and P. vinckei do not increase their rates of gametocytogenesis in response to mosquito probing'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this