Role of bacterial association and penetration on destruction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in beef tissue by high pH

Jon Mikel Woody, Rosemary A. Walsh, Stephanie Doores, William R. Henning, Richard A. Wilson, Stephen J. Knabel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study was undertaken to determine if association with collagen enables Escherichia coli O157:H7 to resist high-pH treatments and to determine the effects of high pH on the survival of E. coli O157:H7 within different layers of beef tissue. E. coli O157:H7 was inoculated onto purified bovine type I collagen on 12-mm2 circular glass coverslips, plain 12-mm2 circular glass coverslips (control), and 12-mm2 irradiated (cobalt-60) lean beef tissue. The rates of destruction of E. coli O157: H7 inoculated on coverslips in pH 10.5 NaHCO3-NaOH buffer at 35°C were determined at various sampling times. E. coli O157:H7 cells associated with collagen and treated in the same manner were also examined using scanning electron microscopy to determine if association with collagen enabled the organism to resist high-pH treatments. The inoculated tissue was treated in pH 13.0 NaHCO3-NaOH buffer at 25°C, and penetrating cells of E. coli O157:H7 were recovered using a cryostat technique. There was no significant difference (P < 0.05) between the rates of destruction of collagen-associated E. coli O157:H7 and non-collagen-associated E. coli O157:H7 following exposure to high-pH treatments. Scanning electron micrographs showed that collagen-associated E. coli O157:H7 cells appeared physically damaged by exposure to high-pH treatments, and association of E. coli O157:H7 to collagen did not increase the resistance of the organism to destruction by high-pH rinses. No significant differences were seen between 20 ml of NaHCO3-NaOH buffer at pH 13.0 (treatment) and 20 ml of distilled water at pH 7.0 (control) when E. coli O157:H7 cells were recovered in beef tissue at depths of up to 2,000 μm (P < 0.05). The ability of E. coli O157:H7 to penetrate beef tissue may be an important factor in reducing the effectiveness of high-pH treatments in killing this organism on beef tissue. This finding should be considered in the future when designing treatments to decontaminate beef carcasses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-11
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Food Protection
Volume63
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2000

Fingerprint

Escherichia coli O157
beef
collagen
Collagen
Buffers
buffers
Glass
tissues
Red Meat
glass
organisms
cells
beef carcasses
cobalt
Collagen Type I
Cobalt
Electron Scanning Microscopy
scanning electron microscopy
electrons

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Microbiology

Cite this

Woody, Jon Mikel ; Walsh, Rosemary A. ; Doores, Stephanie ; Henning, William R. ; Wilson, Richard A. ; Knabel, Stephen J. / Role of bacterial association and penetration on destruction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in beef tissue by high pH. In: Journal of Food Protection. 2000 ; Vol. 63, No. 1. pp. 3-11.
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abstract = "This study was undertaken to determine if association with collagen enables Escherichia coli O157:H7 to resist high-pH treatments and to determine the effects of high pH on the survival of E. coli O157:H7 within different layers of beef tissue. E. coli O157:H7 was inoculated onto purified bovine type I collagen on 12-mm2 circular glass coverslips, plain 12-mm2 circular glass coverslips (control), and 12-mm2 irradiated (cobalt-60) lean beef tissue. The rates of destruction of E. coli O157: H7 inoculated on coverslips in pH 10.5 NaHCO3-NaOH buffer at 35°C were determined at various sampling times. E. coli O157:H7 cells associated with collagen and treated in the same manner were also examined using scanning electron microscopy to determine if association with collagen enabled the organism to resist high-pH treatments. The inoculated tissue was treated in pH 13.0 NaHCO3-NaOH buffer at 25°C, and penetrating cells of E. coli O157:H7 were recovered using a cryostat technique. There was no significant difference (P < 0.05) between the rates of destruction of collagen-associated E. coli O157:H7 and non-collagen-associated E. coli O157:H7 following exposure to high-pH treatments. Scanning electron micrographs showed that collagen-associated E. coli O157:H7 cells appeared physically damaged by exposure to high-pH treatments, and association of E. coli O157:H7 to collagen did not increase the resistance of the organism to destruction by high-pH rinses. No significant differences were seen between 20 ml of NaHCO3-NaOH buffer at pH 13.0 (treatment) and 20 ml of distilled water at pH 7.0 (control) when E. coli O157:H7 cells were recovered in beef tissue at depths of up to 2,000 μm (P < 0.05). The ability of E. coli O157:H7 to penetrate beef tissue may be an important factor in reducing the effectiveness of high-pH treatments in killing this organism on beef tissue. This finding should be considered in the future when designing treatments to decontaminate beef carcasses.",
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Role of bacterial association and penetration on destruction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in beef tissue by high pH. / Woody, Jon Mikel; Walsh, Rosemary A.; Doores, Stephanie; Henning, William R.; Wilson, Richard A.; Knabel, Stephen J.

In: Journal of Food Protection, Vol. 63, No. 1, 01.2000, p. 3-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Role of bacterial association and penetration on destruction of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in beef tissue by high pH

AU - Woody, Jon Mikel

AU - Walsh, Rosemary A.

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AU - Knabel, Stephen J.

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N2 - This study was undertaken to determine if association with collagen enables Escherichia coli O157:H7 to resist high-pH treatments and to determine the effects of high pH on the survival of E. coli O157:H7 within different layers of beef tissue. E. coli O157:H7 was inoculated onto purified bovine type I collagen on 12-mm2 circular glass coverslips, plain 12-mm2 circular glass coverslips (control), and 12-mm2 irradiated (cobalt-60) lean beef tissue. The rates of destruction of E. coli O157: H7 inoculated on coverslips in pH 10.5 NaHCO3-NaOH buffer at 35°C were determined at various sampling times. E. coli O157:H7 cells associated with collagen and treated in the same manner were also examined using scanning electron microscopy to determine if association with collagen enabled the organism to resist high-pH treatments. The inoculated tissue was treated in pH 13.0 NaHCO3-NaOH buffer at 25°C, and penetrating cells of E. coli O157:H7 were recovered using a cryostat technique. There was no significant difference (P < 0.05) between the rates of destruction of collagen-associated E. coli O157:H7 and non-collagen-associated E. coli O157:H7 following exposure to high-pH treatments. Scanning electron micrographs showed that collagen-associated E. coli O157:H7 cells appeared physically damaged by exposure to high-pH treatments, and association of E. coli O157:H7 to collagen did not increase the resistance of the organism to destruction by high-pH rinses. No significant differences were seen between 20 ml of NaHCO3-NaOH buffer at pH 13.0 (treatment) and 20 ml of distilled water at pH 7.0 (control) when E. coli O157:H7 cells were recovered in beef tissue at depths of up to 2,000 μm (P < 0.05). The ability of E. coli O157:H7 to penetrate beef tissue may be an important factor in reducing the effectiveness of high-pH treatments in killing this organism on beef tissue. This finding should be considered in the future when designing treatments to decontaminate beef carcasses.

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