Role of cerebral cortex in human postural control: An EEG study

Semyon Slobounov, M. Hallett, S. Stanhope, H. Shibasaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

86 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It was our primary objective to provide evidence supporting the existence of neural detectors for postural instability that could trigger the compensatory adjustments to avoid falls. Twelve young healthy subjects performed self-initiated oscillatory and discrete postural movements in the anterior-posterior (AP) directions with maximal range of motion predominantly at ankle joint. Movements were recorded by the system and included force plate and EMG, and EEG measures from 25 electrode sites. The center of pressure dynamics and stability index were calculated, and EEG potentials both in voltage and frequency domains were extracted by averaging and Morlet wavelet techniques, respectively. The initiation of self-paced postural movement was preceded by slow negative DC shift, similar to movement-related cortical potentials (MRCP) accompanying voluntary limb movement. A burst of gamma activity preceded the initiation of compensatory backward postural movement when balance was in danger. This was evident for both oscillatory and discrete AP postural movements. The spatial distribution of EEG patterns in postural actions approximated that previously observed during the postural perceptual tasks. The results suggest an important role of the higher cortical structures in regulation of posture equilibrium in dynamic stances. Postural reactions to prevent falls may be triggered by central command mechanisms identified by a burst of EEG gamma activity. The results from this study contribute to our understanding of neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the cortical control of human upright posture in normal subjects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)315-323
Number of pages9
JournalClinical Neurophysiology
Volume116
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2005

Fingerprint

Cerebral Cortex
Electroencephalography
Posture
Ankle Joint
Articular Range of Motion
Healthy Volunteers
Electrodes
Extremities
Pressure

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sensory Systems
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Slobounov, Semyon ; Hallett, M. ; Stanhope, S. ; Shibasaki, H. / Role of cerebral cortex in human postural control : An EEG study. In: Clinical Neurophysiology. 2005 ; Vol. 116, No. 2. pp. 315-323.
@article{0e48dac9ee4c4a199f243bae248b9bbd,
title = "Role of cerebral cortex in human postural control: An EEG study",
abstract = "It was our primary objective to provide evidence supporting the existence of neural detectors for postural instability that could trigger the compensatory adjustments to avoid falls. Twelve young healthy subjects performed self-initiated oscillatory and discrete postural movements in the anterior-posterior (AP) directions with maximal range of motion predominantly at ankle joint. Movements were recorded by the system and included force plate and EMG, and EEG measures from 25 electrode sites. The center of pressure dynamics and stability index were calculated, and EEG potentials both in voltage and frequency domains were extracted by averaging and Morlet wavelet techniques, respectively. The initiation of self-paced postural movement was preceded by slow negative DC shift, similar to movement-related cortical potentials (MRCP) accompanying voluntary limb movement. A burst of gamma activity preceded the initiation of compensatory backward postural movement when balance was in danger. This was evident for both oscillatory and discrete AP postural movements. The spatial distribution of EEG patterns in postural actions approximated that previously observed during the postural perceptual tasks. The results suggest an important role of the higher cortical structures in regulation of posture equilibrium in dynamic stances. Postural reactions to prevent falls may be triggered by central command mechanisms identified by a burst of EEG gamma activity. The results from this study contribute to our understanding of neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the cortical control of human upright posture in normal subjects.",
author = "Semyon Slobounov and M. Hallett and S. Stanhope and H. Shibasaki",
year = "2005",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.clinph.2004.09.007",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "116",
pages = "315--323",
journal = "Clinical Neurophysiology",
issn = "1388-2457",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "2",

}

Role of cerebral cortex in human postural control : An EEG study. / Slobounov, Semyon; Hallett, M.; Stanhope, S.; Shibasaki, H.

In: Clinical Neurophysiology, Vol. 116, No. 2, 01.02.2005, p. 315-323.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Role of cerebral cortex in human postural control

T2 - An EEG study

AU - Slobounov, Semyon

AU - Hallett, M.

AU - Stanhope, S.

AU - Shibasaki, H.

PY - 2005/2/1

Y1 - 2005/2/1

N2 - It was our primary objective to provide evidence supporting the existence of neural detectors for postural instability that could trigger the compensatory adjustments to avoid falls. Twelve young healthy subjects performed self-initiated oscillatory and discrete postural movements in the anterior-posterior (AP) directions with maximal range of motion predominantly at ankle joint. Movements were recorded by the system and included force plate and EMG, and EEG measures from 25 electrode sites. The center of pressure dynamics and stability index were calculated, and EEG potentials both in voltage and frequency domains were extracted by averaging and Morlet wavelet techniques, respectively. The initiation of self-paced postural movement was preceded by slow negative DC shift, similar to movement-related cortical potentials (MRCP) accompanying voluntary limb movement. A burst of gamma activity preceded the initiation of compensatory backward postural movement when balance was in danger. This was evident for both oscillatory and discrete AP postural movements. The spatial distribution of EEG patterns in postural actions approximated that previously observed during the postural perceptual tasks. The results suggest an important role of the higher cortical structures in regulation of posture equilibrium in dynamic stances. Postural reactions to prevent falls may be triggered by central command mechanisms identified by a burst of EEG gamma activity. The results from this study contribute to our understanding of neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the cortical control of human upright posture in normal subjects.

AB - It was our primary objective to provide evidence supporting the existence of neural detectors for postural instability that could trigger the compensatory adjustments to avoid falls. Twelve young healthy subjects performed self-initiated oscillatory and discrete postural movements in the anterior-posterior (AP) directions with maximal range of motion predominantly at ankle joint. Movements were recorded by the system and included force plate and EMG, and EEG measures from 25 electrode sites. The center of pressure dynamics and stability index were calculated, and EEG potentials both in voltage and frequency domains were extracted by averaging and Morlet wavelet techniques, respectively. The initiation of self-paced postural movement was preceded by slow negative DC shift, similar to movement-related cortical potentials (MRCP) accompanying voluntary limb movement. A burst of gamma activity preceded the initiation of compensatory backward postural movement when balance was in danger. This was evident for both oscillatory and discrete AP postural movements. The spatial distribution of EEG patterns in postural actions approximated that previously observed during the postural perceptual tasks. The results suggest an important role of the higher cortical structures in regulation of posture equilibrium in dynamic stances. Postural reactions to prevent falls may be triggered by central command mechanisms identified by a burst of EEG gamma activity. The results from this study contribute to our understanding of neurophysiological mechanisms underlying the cortical control of human upright posture in normal subjects.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=12344292439&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=12344292439&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.clinph.2004.09.007

DO - 10.1016/j.clinph.2004.09.007

M3 - Article

C2 - 15661110

AN - SCOPUS:12344292439

VL - 116

SP - 315

EP - 323

JO - Clinical Neurophysiology

JF - Clinical Neurophysiology

SN - 1388-2457

IS - 2

ER -