Role of filter-feeding in the nutritional biology of a deep-sea mussel with methanotrophic symbionts

H. M. Page, C. R. Fisher, J. J. Childress

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The ability of an undescribed deep-sea hydrocarbon-seep mussel which contains endosymbiotic methanotrophic bacteria to clear, ingest, and assimilate radiolabeled bacteria (Vibrio pelagicus and Escherichia coli) and algae (Dunaliella tertiolecta) was compared with that of the bay mussel Mytilus edulis. The seep mussel, collected in August 1987 from the Louisana Slope in the Gulf of Mexico, was slower to clear bacteria and algae than M. edulis. The ingestion and assimilation of filtered bacteria and algae was established from the presence of radiolabel in mussel tissues and feces. The seep mussel was somewhat less efficient in assimilating radiolabeled components from bacteria and algae than M. edulis. The dietary carbon maintenance-requirement of the seep mussel could potentially be met at environmental concentrations of greater than 106 bacteria ml-1. At lower concentrations of particulate organic matter, filter-feeding could be an important source of nitrogen and essential nutrients not supplied by the endosymbionts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)251-257
Number of pages7
JournalMarine Biology
Volume104
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 1990

Fingerprint

algae
filter feeding
symbiont
symbionts
mussels
deep sea
Biological Sciences
bacterium
bacteria
Mytilus edulis
alga
hydrocarbon seep
Dunaliella tertiolecta
endosymbiont
endosymbionts
Vibrio
particulate organic matter
Gulf of Mexico
feces
hydrocarbons

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Aquatic Science

Cite this

Page, H. M. ; Fisher, C. R. ; Childress, J. J. / Role of filter-feeding in the nutritional biology of a deep-sea mussel with methanotrophic symbionts. In: Marine Biology. 1990 ; Vol. 104, No. 2. pp. 251-257.
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Role of filter-feeding in the nutritional biology of a deep-sea mussel with methanotrophic symbionts. / Page, H. M.; Fisher, C. R.; Childress, J. J.

In: Marine Biology, Vol. 104, No. 2, 01.06.1990, p. 251-257.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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