Role of multiple hosts in the cross-species transmission and emergence of a pandemic parvovirus

Andrew B. Allison, Carole E. Harbison, Israel Pagan, Karla M. Stucker, Jason T. Kaelber, Justin D. Brown, Mark G. Ruder, M. Kevin Keel, Edward J. Dubovi, Edward C. Holmes, Colin R. Parrish

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Understanding the mechanisms of cross-species virus transmission is critical to anticipating emerging infectious diseases. Canine parvovirus type 2 (CPV-2) emerged as a variant of a feline parvovirus when it acquired mutations that allowed binding to the canine transferrin receptor type 1 (TfR). However, CPV-2 was soon replaced by a variant virus (CPV-2a) that differed in antigenicity and receptor binding. Here we show that the emergence of CPV involved an additional host range variant virus that has circulated undetected in raccoons for at least 24 years, with transfers to and from dogs. Raccoon virus capsids showed little binding to the canine TfR, showed little infection of canine cells, and had altered antigenic structures. Remarkably, in capsid protein (VP2) phylogenies, most raccoon viruses fell as evolutionary intermediates between the CPV-2 and CPV-2a strains, suggesting that passage through raccoons assisted in the evolution of CPV-2a. This highlights the potential role of alternative hosts in viral emergence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)865-872
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of virology
Volume86
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

Parvovirus
Protoparvovirus
Procyon lotor
Raccoons
Pandemics
pandemic
Carnivore protoparvovirus 1
Canine Parvovirus
Viruses
viruses
dogs
transferrin
Canidae
Transferrin Receptors
receptors
Feline parvovirus
Feline Panleukopenia Virus
alternative hosts
capsid
emerging diseases

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Microbiology
  • Immunology
  • Insect Science
  • Virology

Cite this

Allison, A. B., Harbison, C. E., Pagan, I., Stucker, K. M., Kaelber, J. T., Brown, J. D., ... Parrish, C. R. (2012). Role of multiple hosts in the cross-species transmission and emergence of a pandemic parvovirus. Journal of virology, 86(2), 865-872. https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.06187-11
Allison, Andrew B. ; Harbison, Carole E. ; Pagan, Israel ; Stucker, Karla M. ; Kaelber, Jason T. ; Brown, Justin D. ; Ruder, Mark G. ; Keel, M. Kevin ; Dubovi, Edward J. ; Holmes, Edward C. ; Parrish, Colin R. / Role of multiple hosts in the cross-species transmission and emergence of a pandemic parvovirus. In: Journal of virology. 2012 ; Vol. 86, No. 2. pp. 865-872.
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Allison, AB, Harbison, CE, Pagan, I, Stucker, KM, Kaelber, JT, Brown, JD, Ruder, MG, Keel, MK, Dubovi, EJ, Holmes, EC & Parrish, CR 2012, 'Role of multiple hosts in the cross-species transmission and emergence of a pandemic parvovirus', Journal of virology, vol. 86, no. 2, pp. 865-872. https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.06187-11

Role of multiple hosts in the cross-species transmission and emergence of a pandemic parvovirus. / Allison, Andrew B.; Harbison, Carole E.; Pagan, Israel; Stucker, Karla M.; Kaelber, Jason T.; Brown, Justin D.; Ruder, Mark G.; Keel, M. Kevin; Dubovi, Edward J.; Holmes, Edward C.; Parrish, Colin R.

In: Journal of virology, Vol. 86, No. 2, 01.01.2012, p. 865-872.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Allison AB, Harbison CE, Pagan I, Stucker KM, Kaelber JT, Brown JD et al. Role of multiple hosts in the cross-species transmission and emergence of a pandemic parvovirus. Journal of virology. 2012 Jan 1;86(2):865-872. https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.06187-11