Romance and rights: The politics of interracial intimacy, 1945-1954

Research output: Book/ReportBook

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Romance and Rights: The Politics of Interracial Intimacy, 1945-1954 studies the meaning of interracial romance, love, and sex in the ten years after World War II. How was interracial romance treated in popular culture by civil rights leaders, African American soldiers, and white segregationists? Previous studies focus on the period beginning in 1967 when the Supreme Court overturned the last state antimiscegenation law (Loving v. Virginia). Lubin's study, however, suggests that we cannot fully understand contemporary debates about "hybridity," or mixed-race identity, without first comprehending how WWII changed the terrain. The book focuses on the years immediately after the war, when ideologies of race, gender, and sexuality were being reformulated and solidified in both the academy and the public. Lubin shows that interracial romance, particularly between blacks and whites, was a testing ground for both the general American public and the American government. The government wanted interracial relationships to be treated primarily as private affairs to keep attention off contradictions between its outward aura of cultural freedom and the realities of Jim Crow politics and antimiscegenation laws. Activists, however, wanted interracial intimacy treated as a public act, one that could be used symbolically to promote equal rights and expanded opportunities. These contradictory impulses helped shape our current perceptions about interracial romances and their broader significance in American culture. Romance and Rights ends in 1954, the year of the Brown v. Board of Education decision, before the civil rights movement became well organized. By closely examining postwar popular culture, African American literature, NAACP manuscripts, miscegenation laws, and segregationist protest letters, among other resources, the author analyzes postwar attitudes towards interracial romance, showing how complex and often contradictory those attitudes could be. Alex Lubin is a professor of American studies at the University of New Mexico. His work has been published in American Quarterly, Labor Studies, and OAH History Magazine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
PublisherUniversity Press of Mississippi
Number of pages183
ISBN (Print)9781578067053
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005

Fingerprint

Interracial
Romance
Intimacy
Government
Popular Culture
Second World War
Contradictory
Testing
Letters
History
Hybridity
American Soldiers
Ideology
Education
Labor
Jim Crow
Civil Rights
American Culture
Activists
Miscegenation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Arts and Humanities(all)

Cite this

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Romance and rights : The politics of interracial intimacy, 1945-1954. / Lubin, Alex.

University Press of Mississippi, 2005. 183 p.

Research output: Book/ReportBook

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