Root structure and function in an ecological context

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Wahl & Ryser paper represents a valuable contribution to revealing ecological patterns associated with root structure. There is a need to identify simple metrics in roots, as has been done with specific leaf area in leaves, which can be used to understand broad patterns of physiological and ecological plant traits. As plant processes are generalized to ecosystem, landscape and regional scales, such simple metrics become increasingly valuable. Currently, the identification of useful metrics in roots, such as tissue density and vessel diameter, is only in its infancy. How well the relationships Wahl & Ryser found in grasses will apply to other plant families still needs to be explored. Given the vast literature on comparative studies in leaves, critical examinations of how root structure relates to leaf structure and the ecology of the plant is long overdue.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)353-354
Number of pages2
JournalNew Phytologist
Volume148
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2000

Fingerprint

ecological function
Ecology
Ecosystems
Tissue
Plant Structures
Poaceae
leaves
plant ecology
Ecosystem
infancy
leaf area
grasses
ecosystems

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Plant Science

Cite this

@article{c8004eeb91834c7da20582f2eb4367c4,
title = "Root structure and function in an ecological context",
abstract = "The Wahl & Ryser paper represents a valuable contribution to revealing ecological patterns associated with root structure. There is a need to identify simple metrics in roots, as has been done with specific leaf area in leaves, which can be used to understand broad patterns of physiological and ecological plant traits. As plant processes are generalized to ecosystem, landscape and regional scales, such simple metrics become increasingly valuable. Currently, the identification of useful metrics in roots, such as tissue density and vessel diameter, is only in its infancy. How well the relationships Wahl & Ryser found in grasses will apply to other plant families still needs to be explored. Given the vast literature on comparative studies in leaves, critical examinations of how root structure relates to leaf structure and the ecology of the plant is long overdue.",
author = "David Eissenstat",
year = "2000",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1046/j.1469-8137.2000.00781.x",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "148",
pages = "353--354",
journal = "New Phytologist",
issn = "0028-646X",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "3",

}

Root structure and function in an ecological context. / Eissenstat, David.

In: New Phytologist, Vol. 148, No. 3, 01.12.2000, p. 353-354.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

TY - JOUR

T1 - Root structure and function in an ecological context

AU - Eissenstat, David

PY - 2000/12/1

Y1 - 2000/12/1

N2 - The Wahl & Ryser paper represents a valuable contribution to revealing ecological patterns associated with root structure. There is a need to identify simple metrics in roots, as has been done with specific leaf area in leaves, which can be used to understand broad patterns of physiological and ecological plant traits. As plant processes are generalized to ecosystem, landscape and regional scales, such simple metrics become increasingly valuable. Currently, the identification of useful metrics in roots, such as tissue density and vessel diameter, is only in its infancy. How well the relationships Wahl & Ryser found in grasses will apply to other plant families still needs to be explored. Given the vast literature on comparative studies in leaves, critical examinations of how root structure relates to leaf structure and the ecology of the plant is long overdue.

AB - The Wahl & Ryser paper represents a valuable contribution to revealing ecological patterns associated with root structure. There is a need to identify simple metrics in roots, as has been done with specific leaf area in leaves, which can be used to understand broad patterns of physiological and ecological plant traits. As plant processes are generalized to ecosystem, landscape and regional scales, such simple metrics become increasingly valuable. Currently, the identification of useful metrics in roots, such as tissue density and vessel diameter, is only in its infancy. How well the relationships Wahl & Ryser found in grasses will apply to other plant families still needs to be explored. Given the vast literature on comparative studies in leaves, critical examinations of how root structure relates to leaf structure and the ecology of the plant is long overdue.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0034486033&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0034486033&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1046/j.1469-8137.2000.00781.x

DO - 10.1046/j.1469-8137.2000.00781.x

M3 - Review article

AN - SCOPUS:0034486033

VL - 148

SP - 353

EP - 354

JO - New Phytologist

JF - New Phytologist

SN - 0028-646X

IS - 3

ER -