Rumination Disorder: Differential Diagnosis

SUSAN DICKERSON MAYES, FREDERICK J. HUMPHREY, H. ALLEN HANDFORD, JOHN F. MITCHELL

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

24 Scopus citations

Abstract

Two types of rumination, psychogenic and self-stimulating, are hypothesized based on a review of 66 cases. In both types, the rumination is self-induced, purposeful, and pleasurable, and the incidence is five times greater in male than in female subjects. Psychogenic rumination occurs in infancy, developmental status is usually normal, and there is often a disturbed parent-child relationship. Self-stimulating rumination is evident in mentally retarded individuals of any age and may occur in the presence of nurturing adults. These findings are in contrast to the single disorder and equal gender prevalence described in the DSM-III-R.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)300-302
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Volume27
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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