Rural-urban differences in cannabis detected in fatally injured drivers in the United States

Sunday Azagba, Lingpeng Shan, Keely Latham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

While there is a vast literature on rural and urban differences in substance use, little is known in terms of cannabis positive drug tests among fatally injured drivers. In the present study, we examined rural-urban differences in cannabis detected in fatally-injured drivers. Data were drawn from the 2015–2017 Fatality Analysis Reporting System. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to examine rural-urban differences in the percentage of cannabis detected in fatally-injured drivers. Analyses were stratified by rural-urban classification and sex. A positive cannabis test in fatally-injured drivers was more prevalent in urban locations. Compared to fatally-injured drivers in rural locations, urban drivers had higher odds of a positive test for cannabinoids (aOR: 1.21, 95% CI 1.14–1.28). Non-Hispanic Black drivers had higher odds of testing positive for cannabinoids (aOR: 1.43, 95% CI 1.31–1.55). Those aged at least 25 years had lower odds of a positive test for cannabinoids. Drivers involved in a weekend nighttime crash (aOR: 1.14, 95% CI 1.03–1.26) and weekday nighttime (aOR: 1.15, 95% CI 1.05–1.26) had higher odds of testing positive for cannabinoids compared to drivers involved in a weekend daytime crash. Results showed significant rural-urban differences in the prevalence of cannabis detected in fatally-injured drivers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number105975
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume132
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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