Sad-and-social is not smart: The moderating effects of social anticipation on mood and information processing

Kosha D. Bramesfeld, Karen Gasper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

We examined if anticipating working collectively, rather than individually, moderates the effects of mood on information processing through (a) distraction, (b) loafing, and/or (c) task engagement. When participants anticipated working collectively, rather than individually, those in sad moods became distracted by the social elements of the task, resulting in a reduced information focus. In contrast, those in happy moods became engaged in the collective task, increasing their intended effort, raising their information focus, and improving their performance on the task. Social loafing effects did not occur. Mediation analyses revealed that these effects were due to changes in information focus, not social focus or intended effort.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)146-151
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Experimental Social Psychology
Volume46
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2010

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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