Safety of weightlifting among women with or at risk for breast cancer-related Lymphedema: Musculoskeletal injuries and health care use in a weightlifting rehabilitation trial

Justin C. Brown, Andrea B. Troxel, Kathryn H. Schmitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Introduction. It has been noted that only 14% of all clinical trials are translated into practice. The objective of this paper is to promote translation of an efficacious rehabilitative exercise program for breast cancer survivors by clarifying for clinicians the safety profile of participants (e.g., rates of musculoskeletal injury and referral to medical professionals), and to use this evidence to make recommendations on the appropriate training of health and fitness staff who would be capable of safely, effectively, and sustainably delivering the program. Methods. Breast cancer survivors with and at risk for lymphedema were randomized to twice-weekly weightlifting or standard care for 1 year. An injury survey and health care evaluation were administered after 1 year and in 3-month intervals, respectively. Results. The cumulative incidence and rate of injury were higher in the weightlifting than in the control group. The injury rates were 2.3 and 0.3 per 1,000 bouts of weightlifting among breast cancer survivors with and at risk for lymphedema, respectively. Among breast cancer survivors with or at risk for lymphedema, 20.9% in the weightlifting group had an encounter with a health care provider that required cessation or dose modification of weightlifting. Conclusion. Despite the demonstrated efficacy of weightlifting, musculoskeletal injuries and other health problems did occur. Therefore, for the successful translation of this rehabilitative intervention into clinical practice, health and fitness professionals working with breast cancer survivors need the knowledge, skills, and abilities that clarify their scope of practice to address these health care needs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1120-1128
Number of pages9
JournalOncologist
Volume17
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2012

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Survivors
Rehabilitation
Lymphedema
Breast Neoplasms
Delivery of Health Care
Safety
Wounds and Injuries
Health
Sensitivity Training Groups
Health Care Surveys
Aptitude
Health Personnel
Referral and Consultation
Breast Cancer Lymphedema
Clinical Trials
Exercise
Control Groups
Incidence

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

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title = "Safety of weightlifting among women with or at risk for breast cancer-related Lymphedema: Musculoskeletal injuries and health care use in a weightlifting rehabilitation trial",
abstract = "Introduction. It has been noted that only 14{\%} of all clinical trials are translated into practice. The objective of this paper is to promote translation of an efficacious rehabilitative exercise program for breast cancer survivors by clarifying for clinicians the safety profile of participants (e.g., rates of musculoskeletal injury and referral to medical professionals), and to use this evidence to make recommendations on the appropriate training of health and fitness staff who would be capable of safely, effectively, and sustainably delivering the program. Methods. Breast cancer survivors with and at risk for lymphedema were randomized to twice-weekly weightlifting or standard care for 1 year. An injury survey and health care evaluation were administered after 1 year and in 3-month intervals, respectively. Results. The cumulative incidence and rate of injury were higher in the weightlifting than in the control group. The injury rates were 2.3 and 0.3 per 1,000 bouts of weightlifting among breast cancer survivors with and at risk for lymphedema, respectively. Among breast cancer survivors with or at risk for lymphedema, 20.9{\%} in the weightlifting group had an encounter with a health care provider that required cessation or dose modification of weightlifting. Conclusion. Despite the demonstrated efficacy of weightlifting, musculoskeletal injuries and other health problems did occur. Therefore, for the successful translation of this rehabilitative intervention into clinical practice, health and fitness professionals working with breast cancer survivors need the knowledge, skills, and abilities that clarify their scope of practice to address these health care needs.",
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Safety of weightlifting among women with or at risk for breast cancer-related Lymphedema : Musculoskeletal injuries and health care use in a weightlifting rehabilitation trial. / Brown, Justin C.; Troxel, Andrea B.; Schmitz, Kathryn H.

In: Oncologist, Vol. 17, No. 8, 01.08.2012, p. 1120-1128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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