Same-Gender Peer Interaction and Preschoolers’ Gender-Typed Emotional Expressiveness

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The present study was guided by hypotheses derived from peer-socialization models of gender development that suggest preschool children’s time spent interacting with same-gender peers would be linked to gender-typed emotional expressiveness. Specifically, I predicted that girls who engaged in high levels of same-gender peer interaction would express more happiness, sadness, and fear, whereas boys who engaged in more same-gender peer interaction would express more anger. To address these hypotheses, a longitudinal study was conducted in which video recordings were made of 122 preschool children (57 boys, 65 girls; 86 European American, 9 African American, 17 Hispanic, and 10 other ethnicity) attending a University sponsored preschool program in the U.S. Southwest over a period of 2 years. Video recordings of children’s peer interactions in Years 1 and 2 were coded for involvement with same-gender peers and emotional expressiveness. Results of analyses revealed that both girls and boys who spent more time interacting with same-gender peers in Year 1 expressed more happiness in Year 2. Boys who spent more time interacting with same-gender peers in Year 1 displayed higher levels of anger in Year 2. Girls who spent more time interacting with same-gender peers in Year 1 displayed higher levels of sadness in Year 2. The findings support arguments made by the peer-socialization model of gender development that gender-segregated peer interaction contributes to patterns of gender-typed expression of emotions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)231-242
Number of pages12
JournalSex Roles
Volume75
Issue number5-6
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

Fingerprint

Video Recording
Happiness
Socialization
gender
Anger
interaction
Southwestern United States
Preschool Children
Hispanic Americans
African Americans
Fear
Longitudinal Studies
Emotions
video recording
happiness
anger
socialization
preschool child
longitudinal study
emotion

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Gender Studies
  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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Same-Gender Peer Interaction and Preschoolers’ Gender-Typed Emotional Expressiveness. / Lindsey, Eric.

In: Sex Roles, Vol. 75, No. 5-6, 01.09.2016, p. 231-242.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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