Sanctification and spiritual disclosure in parent-child relationships: Implications for family relationship quality

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

Social scientific research on family life, religion, and spirituality tends to focus on global religiousness and spirituality with few studies seeking to understand interpersonal religious and spiritual contributors, namely sanctification and spiritual disclosure, from multiple family members' perspectives. This study explored 91 mother-college student and 64 father-college student dyads who rated their use of spiritual disclosure and theistic and nontheistic sanctification of the parent- child dyad in relation to parent- child relationship quality (e.g., parent- child relationship satisfaction and open communication). Results indicate significant positive links between higher levels of spiritual disclosure and greater theistic and nontheistic sanctification, for mothers, fathers, and their children. However, only greater nontheistic sanctification and higher levels spiritual disclosure were significantly related to increased parent- child relationship quality. Through use of Actor-Partner Interdependence Models (APIMs) results indicated unique contributions of spiritual disclosure to parent- child relationship quality above nontheistic sanctification for open communication in the family. However, full models, which included nontheistic sanctification and spiritual disclosure, predict college students' relationship satisfaction with their mothers and fathers. Implications for interpersonal religiousness and spirituality as contributors to familial relationship quality in research and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)639-649
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Family Psychology
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2013

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Psychology(all)

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