Satiety after preloads with different amounts of fat and carbohydrate

Implications for obesity

Barbara Jean Rolls, Sion Kim-Harris, Marian W. Fischman, Richard W. Foltin, Timothy H. Moron, Susan A. Stoner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

253 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

High intake of dietary fat may be key in both the etiology and maintenance of obesity. Because a reduction in the proportion of energy derived from fat will be accompanied by an increase in the proportion of energy derived from carbohydrate, this study compared the effects of these macronutrients on eating behavior in obese and lean individuals. The effects of different amounts of fat and carbohydrate, covertly incorporated into yogurt preloads, on subsequent food intake, hunger, and satiety were assessed. A group of 12 normal-weight men, unconcerned about eating and body weight (unrestrained), accurately compensated for the energy in the preloads regardless of the nutrient composition. Other groups (n = 12 per group), including normal- weight restrained men and normal-weight and obese restrained and unrestrained females, did not show such orderly energy compensation; joule-for-joule, the high-fat preloads suppressed intake at lunch less than did high-carbohydrate preloads. These results suggest that a relative insensitivity to the satiating effect of fat could be involved in the development and maintenance of obesity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)476-487
Number of pages12
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition
Volume60
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

Fingerprint

satiety
obesity
Obesity
Fats
Carbohydrates
carbohydrates
energy
lipids
Weights and Measures
Eating
Maintenance
Yogurt
Lunch
lunch
Hunger
Dietary Fats
Feeding Behavior
hunger
fat intake
yogurt

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Rolls, Barbara Jean ; Kim-Harris, Sion ; Fischman, Marian W. ; Foltin, Richard W. ; Moron, Timothy H. ; Stoner, Susan A. / Satiety after preloads with different amounts of fat and carbohydrate : Implications for obesity. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1994 ; Vol. 60, No. 4. pp. 476-487.
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Satiety after preloads with different amounts of fat and carbohydrate : Implications for obesity. / Rolls, Barbara Jean; Kim-Harris, Sion; Fischman, Marian W.; Foltin, Richard W.; Moron, Timothy H.; Stoner, Susan A.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 60, No. 4, 01.01.1994, p. 476-487.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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